The Kennel Club is the UK’s largest organisation dedicated to the health and welfare of dogs. The Kennel Club was founded in 1873 and is able to offer dog owners an unparalleled source of information, experience and advice on dog welfare, dog health, dog training and dog breeding.

The Kennel Club, 1-5 Clarges Street, Piccadilly, London W1J 8AB
Telephone: 01296 318540

Registration queries:
The Kennel Club, 4a Alton House, Gatehouse Way, Aylesbury, Bucks HP19 8XU
Telephone: 01296 318540

Pet Log main number 01296 336579
Pet Log lost and found 01296 737600

Kennel Club News

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KENNEL CLUB SHOW REGULATIONS (PDF)

November 2022

THE KENNEL CLUB LAUNCHES NEW DNA TESTING SERVICES TO IMPROVE DOG HEALTH

With introductory webinar and £20 off throughout November

The Kennel Club has today (1 November) launched its new DNA Testing Services, developed to improve and protect dog health, and to promote responsible dog breeding.

Priced from £60, with a £20 off introductory offer on selected Breed-Specific Packages running throughout November, The Kennel Club DNA Testing Services provide owners with cost-effective access to the most impactful genetic health tests – without the need to carry out each one individually – with results that are easy to interpret and accompanied by breeding and care advice.

The service has been uniquely developed by The Kennel Club, the UK’s largest dog health organisation, in partnership with Weatherbys Scientific, to advance understanding of dog genetics and disease, with those who use the service contributing to canine genetic research – both through data collection and with all funds reinvested into ongoing research and health initiatives.

Available for 80 breeds and aimed at anyone considering breeding, and any owner who wants to better understand their dog’s genetics, The Kennel Club DNA Testing Service collects a dog’s DNA sample via a simple cheek swab. From the swab, the service checks the DNA for markers associated with a number of different inherited breed-relevant disorders and provides advice to help reduce the risk of producing puppies affected by these conditions, so they can ultimately be eradicated through responsible breeding.

Test results will automatically be registered on a dog’s record and available on The Kennel Club website, allowing breeders to find health-tested mates, and puppy buyers to check if the dog they are thinking of buying has come from health-tested parents.  

For owners, understanding a dog’s genetics and knowing which testable hereditary conditions they may be affected by allows preparation for the future. Some dogs affected by hereditary conditions can go undiagnosed during the early stages of disease, due to clinical symptoms being missed or mistaken for ageing, and missing the early signs of disease can leave a dog in unnecessary pain or discomfort. Early intervention can frequently improve quality of life.

To discuss the importance of DNA testing, the impact it can have on dog health and how it can help to eradicate some of the most concerning genetic disorders facing certain breeds, The Kennel Club’s geneticist, Dr Joanna Ilska, is hosting a free interactive webinar on 3 November at 19:00pm - sign up is available here.   

Alongside the health packages, the new DNA Testing Services also offer DNA profiling for all breeds, which is included as standard for multiple-test Breed-Specific Packages at no further cost. This DNA profile provides a unique genetic code for an individual dog, which can be used as a ‘genetic fingerprint’, and unlike other identification means, a DNA profile remains the same throughout the dog’s entire life and cannot be lost, manipulated or destroyed. As DNA profiles can also be used to confirm parentage, a new parental verification service will be available for all breeds – both of these services are new offerings from The Kennel Club and have been developed in partnership with Weatherbys Scientific.  

Dr Joanna Ilska, Genetics & Research Manager at The Kennel Club said: “Research has shown that the number of pedigree dogs at risk of inherited diseases can be dramatically reduced by responsible breeding, thanks to the use of DNA tests. We have seen that around ten years after a DNA test becomes available, the frequency of gene mutations that caused the disease in some breeds decreases by a staggering 90 per cent, or more.

“With that in mind, we are delighted to launch The Kennel Club DNA Testing Services, which allow caring breeders and responsible owners to have a genuine and positive impact on the health of future generations of dogs, in an easy, accessible and cost-effective way. At the same time, those who use the service will be contributing to driving further understanding of canine genetics and disease, and the development of dog health initiatives, with all data and profits reinvested into research as part of The Kennel Club’s mission of making a difference for dogs.”

Paul Flynn, Head of Research and Development at Weatherbys Scientific, added: “Weatherbys Scientific are proud to hold some 25 years’ experience as a global multi-species genetic testing service provider, to ensure professional delivery of the genetic testing aspect of The Kennel Club DNA Testing Services.

“The partnership between The Kennel Club and Weatherbys brings together a combined heritage of nearly 400 years dedicated to animal registration and welfare and we very much look forward to being part of The Kennel Club DNA Testing Services. The service leverages Weatherbys Scientific’s proven laboratory track record and availability of latest in-house molecular technologies to help realise admirable genetic breeding objectives that aim to continuously better the future health and welfare of the canine species.

“Looking into the future; this partnership is scientifically exciting, with both The Kennel Club and Weatherbys Scientific being proven technology adopters - positioning our partnership to harness the benefits of current and future genetic testing capabilities, within an ever-enhancing era of genomic advancements and discovery.”

Assured Breeders and Kennel Club Accredited Instructors receive a 10% discount on the services, and any owner can make use of the introductory £20 off throughout November for all Breed-Specific Packages with DNA profiling included, with the discount code: DNAtest20.

To access the service and for more information, visit thekennelclub.org.uk/TheKennelClubDNAtesting

 

August 2022

THE KENNEL CLUB URGES AWARENESS OF CURRENT IMPORT REGULATIONS

The Kennel Club is urging dog breeders and owners to ensure they are aware of the current ban in place for the commercial imports of dogs, cats and ferrets from Belarus, Poland, Romania and Ukraine.

The temporary suspension in Great Britain was implemented in April 2022 and is due to be lifted on 9 July 2022. However, the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has recently announced that this measure has been extended by a further eight weeks, until 3 September, owing to a reported health risk to humans and animals from commercial cats, dogs and ferrets from these countries that do not comply with UK health and documentation requirements. The importation of dogs for rescue and rehoming purposes is also covered under this prohibition.

Dr Ed Hayes, Head of Public Affairs at The Kennel Club comments: “The movement of dogs under the Pet Travel Scheme from Belarus, Poland and Romania remains permitted, with special measures in place for bringing pets from Ukraine. We would urge anyone seeking to bring dogs into the UK from these four countries to carefully check the rules, to ensure that any movement complies.

“We would also implore anyone considering importing dogs from these countries in the short to medium term to carry out due diligence in the event that the ban is extended beyond September. Any dogs which have been imported in breach of Government regulations will not be registered by The Kennel Club.”

For more information, please visit http://www.gov.uk/guidance/imports-and-exports-of-animals-and-animal-products-topical-issues

 

6th May 2022

The first batch of certificates are now being issued for shows/trials that were held in early 2021, as the process for issuing outstanding awards for all previously held shows and trials begins.

The certificates for shows/trials will be issued in chronological order, beginning with single breed shows and trials that took place between March and June 2021, followed by the first general championship show, Southern Counties Canine Association.

Thereafter, certificates and titles will continue to be issued in show/trial date order, until all delayed certificates and titles have been issued and service resumes as normal.

The process for issuing awards will be as follows:

  • The backlog of shows and activities will be dealt with in date order. If a customer has had multiple awards throughout the year, certificates will be received at different times, depending on the show/trial date. Titles will only be added to dogs’ names when the relevant show/trial at which the title was achieved has been processed.
  • Awards from this year’s shows/trials will not be issued until the backlog has been cleared
  • The Kennel Club will publish an online chart, which exhibitors and competitors can use to track where we are up to in issuing certificates and titles, availbale at thekennelclub.org.uk/awardsupdate2022. Updates will also be posted on relevant Kennel Club show and activity Facebook groups each time a full calendar month of awards for shows/trials have been completed.
  • Titles will appear in exhibitors’ online accounts within 24 hours of processing. The physical certificates should arrive with exhibitors no later than 14 days after the date shown on the online chart. Should there be any issues in receiving the certificate, exhibitors can notify us using the form at thekennelclub.org.uk/awardsover14days.
  • Exhibitors can continue to enter events and classes where eligibility is dependent upon awards and/or titles which are pending confirmation, e.g. moving from Limit to the Open class at dog shows. Also, in the case of Champion Stakes, exhibitors do not need to wait for their dog’s champion status to be confirmed before entering. For any issues which may arise regarding eligibility, please contact breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk.

In order to minimise the potential for delays in receiving certificates, please ensure that:

  • Ownership details on dogs’ records are up to date – you can log into your Kennel Club online account to check this is correct. Please see our FAQs at thekennelclub.org.uk/awardsupdate2022 for more information about checking your dog’s record in your online account.

  • Dogs’ names on show service company databases (e.g. Fosse Data Systems, Higham Press) are the same as recorded on Kennel Club records, including spelling, capital letters and spaces (excluding any differences related to titles). If this is not the case you should revise your online accounts with the show services provider.

Kathryn Mansfield, Kennel Club Secretary said: “We are pleased to finally announce that award certificates are now being issued and apologise to everyone for the long delay.

“Issuing the backlog of certificates and titles will take quite a few months to achieve as awards are issued in chronological order of show/trial dates. We have extra staff working on processing awards so that we can get through these as effectively as possible, whilst not impacting our other services.

“The website will include details of which shows/trials have been processed so that everyone is aware of when certificates are likely to be received. As before it is fine to enter events or classes where eligibility is dependent upon awards and/or titles which are pending confirmation, for example moving from Limit to the Open class at dog shows. Also, in the case of Champion Stakes, exhibitors do not need to wait for their dog’s champion status to be confirmed before entering.

“If customers do not receive their certificates within 14 days of the processing date for that show or trial, as listed on our website, they can contact us using the dedicated form (thekennelclub.org.uk/awardsover14days). We have completed as much testing of the new system as is possible ahead of issuing certificates, but if exhibitors and competitors do have any issues, please let us know and we will do our utmost to sort out the problem as soon as possible.”

For further information about the issuing of awards, including FAQs, and to keep track of those awards that have been processed, please visit thekennelclub.org.uk/awardsupdate2022.

 

 

THE KENNEL CLUB AND FCI REVIEW AND AGREE MUTUAL RECOGNITION OF JUDGES

  • New agreement to be open ended
  • Eligibility for UK judges to be considered to award CACIBs following UK approval to judge a breed at Challenge Certificate level
  • Eligibility to be invited provided a judge is listed on the respective directory
  • Mutual recognition to Group and Best in Show judges

The Kennel Club and the Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI) has signed a new agreement for the mutual recognition of judges, applicable from 1 May 2022.

The previous agreement which expired on this date had been in place for five years and has been a success in recognising the experience of judges approved under each governing body.

Both The Kennel Club and FCI representatives proposed amendments to the agreement based on their experience of the approval route for championship judges, taking account of lessons learnt.

The new contract will enjoy an open-ended duration, with the ability for either side to end the agreement or request amendments with a six-month notice period.

Judges listed on either The Kennel Club Find a Judge website or the FCI Judges Directory are eligible to be invited to judge in the UK or FCI countries.

UK judges will be eligible to award CACIBs once they are approved to award Challenge Certificates. This is particularly relevant to those judges approved to judge those breeds which do not yet have championship status in the UK, in addition to judges approved via the A3 pre-approved grandfathering route and via the Judges Education Programme Level 4 progress.

Best in Show judges approved under both The Kennel Club and FCI will receive mutual recognition and are eligible to be invited to undertake these appointments, subject to approval by the national kennel club.

Group judges under both The Kennel Club and FCI will receive mutual recognition for the complementary groups (as set out in the agreement) and are eligible to be invited to undertake these appointments, subject to approval by the national kennel club.

Show societies inviting judges from FCI member counties to officiate in the UK must make use of the mutual agreement route if the judge is not previously approved to award Challenge Certificates in the UK and meets the criteria. This is of benefit to both inviting society and judge in reducing unnecessary paperwork.

FCI judges are required to have awarded CACIBs in at least three different countries over a period of at least five years to be considered for approval to award Challenge Certificates.

For those judges not fulfilling this criterion, an Overseas Judges Questionnaire will need to be completed for consideration by the Judges Committee.

The amended contract for show societies to request FCI judges to complete can be found here: thekennelclub.org.uk/media/3627/fci-contract.pdf and the document listing the Terms of the Agreement here: thekennelclub.org.uk/media/3408/kennel-club-and-fci-agreement-2017.pdf

Any queries should be directed to breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk.

 

LIMITATION ON ‘HEREDITARY CLEAR’ STATUS POSTPONED TO 2023

Following the announcement that The Kennel Club will limit the assignment of ‘hereditary clear’ status of registered dogs to two generations, the organisation has announced that this change is now set to be implemented as of January 2023.

The decision to restrict hereditary status was made by The Kennel Club Board in 2018 on the recommendation of the Dog Health Group, and followed a Kennel Club study, published in the journal of Canine Genetics and Epidemiology. This change was put forward to safeguard against the impact that dogs with an incorrect ‘hereditary clear’ status could have on health issues within a breed.

Hereditary clear status is given to dogs that are determined to be free of specific genetic material linked to a particular inherited disease. The Kennel Club’s registration system assigns a dog this status if their parents are known to be clear, either because they have both been DNA tested as clear, or because they are hereditary clear themselves.

Dogs could be mistakenly given a false hereditary clear status for a number of reasons; for example if there has been a failure of laboratory protocols, pedigree errors or incorrectly recorded parentage. In these instances it is unlikely that the inaccuracies would be noticed immediately, but rather that several generations later many dogs throughout the breed descended from the individual with the original incorrect status will also have erroneous hereditary status, and the well-intended mating of two such apparently hereditary clear dogs risks producing affected puppies.

The Kennel Club research analysed the risks faced by a population following the incorrect assignment of hereditary status and determined that the rate of dogs with false hereditary clear status could rise considerably over a fairly small number of generations, particularly for genetic conditions that are more common.

To reduce the knock-on effect of these errors, and the risk of unintentionally breeding affected puppies, The Kennel Club will be ensuring that from January 2023, the ‘hereditary clear status’ will be limited to two generations, unless lineage is verified by DNA parentage profiling recorded by The Kennel Club. DNA parentage profiling is a separate procedure to screening DNA for disease causing mutations, but can often be carried out at the same time by the same laboratory.

Originally scheduled to come into effect in January 2022, this has now been postponed to 2023 to allow for necessary development work to be completed and in order for ‘hereditary clear’ status to be as effective and reliable as possible.

 

TRIAL PERIOD EXTENDED FOR CHAMPION CLASSES AT BREED CLUB CHAMPIONSHIP SHOWS

The Kennel Club has extended the trial period for champion classes at breed club championship shows to 31 December 2022, in view of the enforced lockdown caused by Covid-19 and the subsequent lack of data obtained.

Champion classes at breed club championship shows were introduced at the beginning of 2018 and were due to be reviewed by the Show Executive Committee (SEC) after a three-year trial period which expired at the beginning of 2021.

These classes, which are not compulsory, were brought in by the SEC following a recommendation from the Dog Show Promotion Working Party. The winner of the champion class, provided it is unbeaten, joins all other unbeaten dogs or bitches to compete for the relevant Challenge Certificate.   

Breed clubs when submitting results to The Kennel Club are required to indicate whether champion classes were scheduled at their championship show. They should also indicate the number of champions entered in the champion classes as well as the number of champions entered in other classes.

Any queries regarding providing The Kennel Club with data in relation to champion classes should be directed to email awards@thekennelclub.org.uk.

 

C REGULATION AMENDS

 

As a condition of registration a breed society must;

(1) Adopt The Kennel Club Code of Ethics (as amended from time to time) in additional to the Rules set out in C3 below.  The Code of Ethics may not be altered by a Society except at an Annual General Meeting or Special General Meeting notice of which includes details of the proposal to alter the Code.  Such alteration shall not be brought into force until The Kennel Club has been advised and given its approval of the alterations.

(2) Actively support the education and training of judges in accordance with The Kennel Club’s Judges Education Programme (Breed Shows) (as published and amended from time to time). This does not apply to those breed societies which do not have an interest in the exhibition of dogs or scheduling of dog shows.

(Additions in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

C2f

In making any application under the Regulations a Society or Organisation (including its Officers and its Committee Members) expressly agrees to submit to and be bound by The Kennel Club Rules and Regulations and Codes of Best Practice in force at the date of application or as may be amended from time to time in relation to all canine matters with which the Kennel Club is concerned.

(Additions in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

SHOW (F) REGULATION AMENDS

F10

Judging Judges, responsibilities

a.Judges at Kennel Club licensed shows must;                              

  1. Judge in accordance with Kennel Club breed standards.  In assessing dogs, judges must penalise any features or exaggerations which they consider would be detrimental to the soundness, health or well-being of the dog. 
  2. Judges are also expected to act impartially, with integrity and to only judge on the merits of the dogs in competition and consider no other factors.
  3. Judges must maintain and abide by the highest standards in accordance with Kennel Club Rules and Regulations and, appropriate Codes of Best Practice and the criteria described in the Judges Education Programme as published from time to time.
  4. To accept appointments and to judge breed classes at Kennel Club licensed championship, open and limited shows judges must be listed on the relevant breed club judging list or at the appropriate Judges Education Programme Level. Judges must maintain accurate records of educational evidence and confirmed judging appointments.

b. The Board shall have the power to grant, withhold, amend, suspend or cancel the status of a judge.

(Additions in bold)

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

F(1)3.k

For Shows at which a Veterinary Surgeon is present. A suitable place in which dogs suspected of contagious or infectious disease can be properly isolated from the rest of the Show.

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

F(1)5.a.(4)

Where a show is judged on the Group system, unless a class for every breed eligible for separate classification is provided, at least one Any Variety Not Separately Classified class per group must be provided, and at least one Any Variety Imported Breeds Register class per group must also be provided.

(Additions in bold)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

F(1)5.b

A breed club must schedule select and promote at least 2 Supported Entry Open Shows for its breed at General or Group Open Shows each year.  A formal written agreement to be reached with the licensed show Society societies. The Judges of such classes must be selected by the licensed show society from a list of at least two names proposed by the breed club and will be at either JCF Level Judges Education Programme Level 2 or Level 3 (or B List or A3 list). during the Judges Competency Framework transition period).

(Additions in bold)

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

F(1)7.c.(4)

Championship Shows:-

With The name of each breed for which Challenge Certificates are offered must be printed and the names of the judge(s) and referee(s), if applicable, followed by the words ‘Kennel Club Challenge Certificate Dog; Kennel Club Challenge Certificate Bitch‘; and then the classification provided for the breed.

(Additions in bold)

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

F(1)20

a. Not more than three Judges shall be appointed to adjudicate for any award.

​b. a. General canine society, affiliated societies and breed club championship, open and limited shows championship and open shows - affiliated societies and breed club open shows.

(1) Championship Shows

For non Challenge Certificate breeds at championship shows and for general canine society open shows, affiliated organisations open shows and breed club open shows scheduling more than three1 breed classes for a particular breed (five2 classes for Stud Book Band E breeds), the selected judge must, when appointed by the club/society, either:

(a) Have previously been approved to award Challenge Certificates or be listed at Judges Education Programme Level 2 or above for to the relevant breed or

(b) Be included on a Breed Council/Club B judges list or above.

(i) Judges resident in Northern Ireland. Persons who are approved to award Green Stars under Irish Kennel Club Rules and are resident in Northern Ireland are permitted to judge the above mentioned classes at Kennel Club licensed Championship and open shows held in Northern Ireland without being included on a Breed Council/Club judges list.

(ii) Overseas judges. For non Challenge Certificate breeds at championship shows and for general canine society open shows, affiliated organisations open shows and breed club open shows the organising club/society must ensure that any overseas judge appointed to judge more than three breed classes (five classes for Stud Book band E breeds) has been approved to judge the breed concerned at championship level in the country in which they are domiciled, or are on a Kennel Club registered breed club/council B list or above for the breed concerned.

(2) General canine society Open shows and affiliated organisation open shows only. Persons appointed to judge Best in Show, Best in Group, Best Puppy in Group and/or Variety Classes must have previously been approved to award and have awarded Challenge Certificates to at least one breed, and be currently eligible to do so. Classes for varieties of a breed and handling classes are exempt from this Regulation.

1 Non B list judges are permitted to judge a puppy class in addition to the 3 classes currently permitted.

2 Non B list judges are permitted to judge a puppy class in addition to the 5 classes currently permitted. c. If more than one judge is appointed

(2)  Open and Limited Shows

a. For open and limited shows scheduling more than three breed classes (four if including a Puppy class) for a particular breed the selected judge must, when appointed by the club/society, either:

    (i) Have previously been approved to award Challenge Certificates or be listed at Judges Education Programme Level 2 or above for the relevant breed or

(ii) Be included on a Breed Council/Club B judges list or above.

b. For open and limited shows scheduling up to three classes (four if scheduling a Puppy class) for a particular breed, the selected judge must, when appointed by the club/society, either:

    (i)  Be listed at Judges Education Programme Level 1 or

   (ii) Have met the Judges Education Programme Level 1 criteria at the time of accepting the appointment.

Except:-

(i) Judges resident in Northern Ireland. Persons who are approved to award Green Stars under Irish Kennel Club Rules and are resident in Northern Ireland are permitted to judge the above mentioned classes at Kennel Club licensed Championship and open shows held in Northern Ireland without being included on a Breed Council/Club judges list.

(ii) Overseas judges. For non Challenge Certificate breeds at championship shows and for open and limited shows scheduling up to three classes (four if scheduling a Puppy class) for a particular breed the organising club/society must ensure that any overseas judge appointed to judge has been:

a. Approved to judge the breed concerned at championship level in the country in which they are domiciled, or

b. Listed at Judges Education Programme Level 2 or above for the breed concerned, or

c. Are on a Kennel Club registered breed club/council B list or above.

(3)  General canine society open shows and affiliated organisation open shows only. Persons appointed to judge Best in Show, Best in Group, Best Puppy in Group and/or Variety Classes must have previously been approved to award and have awarded Challenge Certificates to at least one breed, and be currently eligible to do so. Classes for varieties of a breed and handling classes are exempt from this Regulation.

(4)  General canine society limited shows and affiliated organisation limited shows only. Persons appointed to judge Best in Show, Best in Group, Best Puppy in Group and/or Variety Classes must be listed at Judges Education Programme Level 2 or above or be on a breed club/council B list or above. Classes for varieties of a breed and handling classes are exempt from this Regulation.

b. The selected judge must, when appointed by the club/society be eligible in accordance with the criteria set out in these Regulations and will not have been declared ineligible to do so by the time of carrying out the appointment.

c. If more than one judge is appointed for any form of competition, a further judge must be appointed to act as referee and the name published in the schedule. However, at a single breed championship show, where more than one judge is appointed, the society may appoint a Best in Show judge instead of a referee, whose name must be published in the schedule.

c. On accepting an appointment the selected judge must ensure that their name is included on a relevant breed council/club judges list or at the appropriate level of the Judges Education Programme.

d. In the event of a judge being unable to complete all allotted judging, a substitute judge must be appointed to complete the judging.

d. All judges at championship shows and open shows must produce a written critique for the first two placings in each Breed class, and will dispatch these to at least one of the weekly United Kingdom canine journals

e. When requested to do so, judges must submit a completed breed health monitoring report form to The Kennel Club within 21 days of the close of the show.

j.(3). k.(3). Championship Shows –

Slips for Best of Sex, Reserve Best of Sex and Best of Breed and the notice regarding the awarding of Challenge Certificates obtainable from The Kennel Club.

Championship Shows –

The notice regarding the awarding of Challenge Certificates, obtainable from the Kennel  Club.

l. m. If a society/club and or judge wish to weigh Miniature Dachshunds at a show the intention to do so must be clearly stated in the show schedule, and a certified weighing machine must be provided. The intention to weigh must be agreed in writing between the judge and the society/club in good time prior to the show and on the day of the show each new dog must be weighed by the judge or with the judge observing.

p. q. Judges may exclude any dog from the ring if it is considered not in a fit state for exhibition owing to savage disposition or suffering from any visible condition which adversely affects its health or welfare and the exclusion must be reported immediately on the day by the judge/steward to the show secretary.  The judge’s decision is final and the dog shall be excluded from all subsequent competition at the Show.  The judge must make a report to the Show Secretary at the first opportunity after the Show.

y. The Committee shall have the power to grant, withhold, suspend or cancel the appointment of any judge.

(Additions in bold)

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

F(1)21

Judging contracts Invitation to Judge

b. Societies are required to include the following wording in Judges’ invitation letters:

‘‘In accepting this invitation you agree to be bound by Kennel Club Rules and Regulations and The Kennel Club Code of Best Practice for Judges. In doing so you also recognise that you are obliged to notify us in writing of any change in your personal circumstances or additional information which will may affect your ability and standing to fulfil this judging appointment.’

'You should also note that we reserve the right to cancel the this contract before the date of the appointment show if there is a change in your circumstances, which in our reasonable opinion would adversely affect your ability to fulfil the appointment.’

d. All judges at championship shows and open shows must produce a written critique for the first two placings in each Breed class, and will dispatch these to at least one of the weekly United Kingdom canine journals

e. When requested to do so, judges must submit a completed breed health monitoring report form to The Kennel Club within 21 days of the close of the show.

g. e. In the event of a judge or society being in breach of any of the terms of a judging contract, the Board may impose a fine. The Judge or Society may be required by the Board to give reasons for such breach, and provide an explanation for any breach of the terms of a judging appointment.  In the event of the explanation not being considered satisfactory, the Board may impose a fine and/or other penalties.

(Additions in bold)

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

F(1)22

Stewards.

Show societies must appoint at least one steward for every ring in which judging is to take place. Stewards shall at all times act in accordance with instructions for stewards (Annex C to these Regulations), a copy of which must be issued to each steward by show societies.

Selection, Appointment and Eligibility to Judge

a. Those judges invited to judge must be selected in accordance with the rules of the Show Society and The Kennel Club Code of Best Practice for Judges as published from time to time and if required evidence of this must be forwarded to The Kennel Club. 

b. Judges so selected must at the time of accepting the invitation and at the time of the appointment be eligible to judge in accordance with Kennel Club Regulations.

c. No announcement may be made by a Show Society of any appointment until the judge has accepted the invitation and the Show Society has confirmed the appointment in writing to the judge. 

d. Application for approval of judge

The show society must apply to the Board for the approval of the following judges with the following conditions:

(1) All applications for the approval to judge with Challenge Certificates, Groups, Best in Show, and Referees, must include both the nomination and the questionnaire (where required), and must be lodged by the show society with the Secretary of The Kennel Club at least 12 months prior to the date of the show on the form provided.

(2) Judges to award Challenge Certificates, at single breed, sub-group and general or group championship shows.

(a) There must be an interval of not less than 18 calendar months between the appointment of a judge to award Challenge Certificates to the same sex of the same breed.

(3) Judges for Group competitions

(a) The judge of a group* at a championship show shall not judge any breed, Any Variety Not Separately Classified or Any Variety Imported Breed Register classes in that group at the show except when acting in the capacity of referee. Subject to the above a group judge is eligible to judge other variety/stakes class(es) at the show.

(b) There must be an interval of not less than 9 calendar months between appointments to judge the same group at championship shows.

*A group judge is not eligible to judge any class or classes at a championship show, from which dogs become eligible to compete in his/her appointed group.

(4) Judges for Best in Show (excluding single breed championship shows).

(a) The judge of Best in Show at a general championship show, shall not judge any breed or variety classes at the show except when acting in the capacity of referee. The judge of Best in Show at a group championship show, shall not judge any breed at the show except when acting in the capacity of referee.

(b) At a sub-group championship show where more than one judge is appointed a separate Best in Show judge must also be appointed, who must not judge any breed or variety classes at the show except when acting in the capacity of referee. At a sub-group championship show where only one judge is appointed a separate Best in Show judge need not be nominated.

(c) There must an interval of not less than 9 calendar months between appointments to judge Best in Show at a Championship Show.

e. Judges for Puppy Group competitions.

The judge of a Puppy Group* at a Championship Show shall not judge any Breed, Any Variety Not Separately Classified or Any Variety Imported Breed Register Classes in that Group at the show except when acting in the capacity of Referee. Subject to the above a Group judge is eligible to judge other variety/stakes class(es) at the show.

* A Group Judge is not eligible to judge any class or classes at a Championship Show, from which dogs become eligible to compete in his/her appointed Group.

f. No more than three Judges shall be appointed to adjudicate for any award.

     g. If more than one judge is appointed for any form of competition, a further judge must be appointed to act as referee and the name published in the schedule. However, at a single breed championship show, where more than one judge is appointed, the society may appoint a Best in Show judge instead of a referee, whose name must be published in the schedule.

     h. Should any judge named in the schedule be unable to fulfil the specified appointment, another judge must be appointed who is eligible to do so. Where Challenge Certificates are available another judge must be appointed who has previously awarded Challenge Certificates in the breed/or is listed at the appropriate Judges Education Programme Level. There must be an interval of not less than 18 calendar months between this appointment and a subsequent appointment to award Challenge Certificates to the same sex of the same breed. The show committee may similarly substitute a Judge for a Group or Best in Show at Championship Show provided that the substitute Judge has been previously approved for, and judged, the same Group or Best in Show or is listed at the appropriate Judges Education Programme Level but who has not accepted an invitation to judge the same Group or Best in Show within the 9 calendar months following the show in question. The circumstances of any such substitution must be reported to The Kennel Club without delay. This appointment must not conflict with the conditions in the contract of a future judging appointment. Such judges must be submitted to the Board for approval. The alteration should be notified to exhibitors if possible.

 i. Where a judge is unable to complete all allotted judging, a substitute judge must be appointed to complete the judging. The appointment of the substitute must be in accordance with the procedure and Regulations for appointing judges in an emergency.

(Additions in bold)

(Deletion struck through)

(Effective 1 January 2021)

 

KENNEL CLUB ISSUES WARNING AS DATA SUGGESTS THOUSANDS OF DOGS AT RISK OF INTOXICATION THIS CHRISTMAS

Following the 2020 rise in dog ownership and worrying statistics which show December brings a number of doggy dangers, The Kennel Club offers advice to keep the UK’s nine million dogs safe this festive season

New data released by The Kennel Club shows that dogs were 86 per cent more likely to poison themselves in December than in any other month in 2019. The five-year statistics, collected by the dog welfare organisation’s insurance partner, Agria Pet Insurance, show the month of December has consistently been the highest for intoxication claims since 2015, causing The Kennel Club to issue a warning to owners about Christmas dangers for our four-legged friends.

“For dogs, Christmas is a time of year when unusual and exciting things are happening around the home – often it means there are new people to meet and greet, exciting things to smell and lick, and unfamiliar festive curiosities, making it a very tempting time for them to get up to all sorts of mischief, or feel anxious or even lonely,” said Bill Lambert, Head of Health and Welfare at The Kennel Club.

“Dogs are a part of the family and of course can be involved in the celebrations, but our four-legged friends don’t always enjoy the same festivities as humans do. We want to make sure that all of the nation’s much-loved dogs have a happy, stress-free and safe Christmas, especially with so many new owners navigating the season – which will no doubt also be different to normal this year – with their puppy or dog.”

Simon Wheeler, Managing Director of Agria Pet Insurance, added: "Every December we see a sharp spike in instances of dogs being poisoned, and the culprit is often festive food. Innocuous things for us like chocolate, Christmas cake or mince pies can prove life-threatening – and for the most foodie or artful of dogs, it can just take seconds for them to eat something they shouldn't. 

“One example from last Christmas was Cocker Spaniel, Ella. She climbed up onto a worktop and ate six mince pies while her owner was out. Despite having rapid veterinary treatment, 24 hours later she suffered renal failure. Fortunately, her vet managed to save her, but not before some devastating moments for her owner, and treatment costs of over £1,100 – at just the wrong time of year for the household budget. 

“We urge dog owners to be extremely careful at Christmas by keeping harmful food or other poisons out of reach, and to contact their vet urgently if their dog eats anything they know or suspect could be toxic." 

To share a safe Christmas with your dog, The Kennel Club, has some ‘impawtant’ tips:

All the trimmings: The foods you shouldn’t feed your dog this Christmas

Each Christmas there are thousands of cases of dogs needing veterinary treatment after stealthily stealing chocolate and other unsuitable festive treats like mince pies and stollen. With so much going on over the festive season it’s not always easy to keep an eye out, so try and keep any chocolate and other treats, from advent calendars to tree decorations, out of paw’s reach.

Owners should be wary of feeding dogs Christmas dinner leftovers, as traditional turkey, goose and chicken bones can easily splinter, particularly when cooked, causing an obstruction and possibly even piercing your dog’s tummy. Be careful of stuffing too – onions, garlic, leeks, shallots and chives all belong to the allium family and all contain a substance which can damage a dog's red blood cells, and can cause potentially life-threatening anaemia.

If you think your dog may have eaten something that they shouldn’t, or have symptoms including sickness and diarrhoea, speak to your vet straight away.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year: But don’t force festive fun

Dogs can have a lot to deal with over the Christmas period – excited and noisy children, crackers banging, presents being unwrapped and unfamiliar people, voices and smells.

It can be overwhelming so avoid forcing festive fun by making sure their routine isn’t disrupted – take them out on their usual walks and keep dinner time the same – and make sure they still have their normal space and bed so they can retreat and settle in their usual spot if and when they want to. Everyone is busy at Christmas with many spending more time away from home, but don’t forget about your four-legged friend or leave them alone for more than four hours. Remember too that many dogs will have got used to their owners being home more due the pandemic, so any transition to spending more time apart will need to be prepared for. While this Christmas might be more restrictive for us, our dogs may still be noticing quite a change.

Deck the halls: Be careful of decoration and present snaffling

Christmas decorations and presents are often just as intriguing and exciting for dogs as they are for humans. Be careful with certain festive plants – poinsettia, holly, mistletoe and ivy can cause varying degrees of stomach upset if eaten by a curious dog.  

Be aware of your dog snaffling gifts that aren’t for them from under the tree. Electronic gifts and toys often contain batteries, which if chewed or swallowed by a dog can be dangerous. Similarly watch out for your dog trying to eat small toys or gifts with small parts, wrapping paper or crepe paper, Christmas decorations, including baubles and tinsel hanging from the Christmas tree, and plastic materials used for wrapping presents.

Let it snow: Steer clear of antifreeze

Care should be taken when using antifreeze products that contain chemicals which can be lethal when ingested by dogs. The sweet taste of antifreeze makes it tempting for dogs, so products should be stored in secure containers away from pets. Watch out too for dogs drinking out of puddles when it’s very cold, as often the water can be tainted with antifreeze chemicals.

There is further advice on how to have a carefree canine Christmas – from at-home training tips to more advice on avoiding seasonal dangers – on The Kennel Club website: thekennelclub.org.uk/christmas.

KENNEL CLUB AND BREED CLUBS DISCUSS NEW CC ALLOCATION MODEL

A series of discussions have now taken place between The Kennel Club and breed clubs regarding the new Challenge Certificate (CC) allocation model, resulting in the sharing of a number of ideas aimed at invigorating the show scene, it has been announced.

The breeds invited to the discussions, held via a series of video conference calls, were those which currently have CC rotations and where the number of CCs available at breed club level is likely to be fewer than the actual number of clubs in the breed. Under the current arrangements, some breed clubs have to wait two or even three years between the scheduling of their championship shows.

The 11 breeds invited to the discussion sessions were Bulldogs, Bull Terriers, Chow Chows, Cocker Spaniels, Collies (Rough and Smooth), Dachshunds, German Shepherd Dogs, Old English Sheepdogs, Poodles, Welsh Corgis (Cardigan and Pembroke) and Yorkshire Terriers. At each session, representatives of the breed clubs and councils attended, as well as Kennel Club representatives. Almost all breed clubs responded to the invitation and were represented.

The new CC allocation model is being used to allocate CCs for the years 2024-28, the exact details of which will be announced in the first half of 2021. At each discussion, it was explained that the number of CCs available to breed clubs for the next allocation has been protected; however, this situation is likely to change with effect from 2029 when the appropriate scale will be applied to each breed.

Part of the discussions revolved around the idea of possible breed club amalgamation, which some breeds said they were embarking upon while others explained that they were currently looking into the concept. Some clubs said that amalgamation did not suit their situation. The Kennel Club stressed that it was not forcing any clubs to amalgamate and that no clubs would be de-registered; however, a reduction in the number of clubs in some breeds might be beneficial to the breed where there are complicated CC rotations coupled with falling numbers of exhibitors, lack of available committee members and a crowded show diary. The Kennel Club’s recent offer was reiterated of guaranteed yearly CC status from 2022 for ten years to any newly amalgamated club.

As the number of CCs allocated to each breed is directly related to show entry figures, discussion also took place on the other ways in which breed clubs could increase their breed entry figures with the consequence of receiving an increase in CCs with the potential for an annual championship show for each of their breed clubs. It was acknowledged that entry figures in the main are better at breed club shows, and it was encouraging to hear that where clubs work with general and group championship shows an improvement in entries resulted. In the long term this will increase the breed’s overall average and thus increase CCs all round.

Some breed club representatives explained that they had held partnership shows with general championship shows, either as a way of attracting a larger entry for their own open show (thus giving valuable hands-on experience to an up-and-coming judge) or to offer exhibitors two opportunities to compete for awards, points and CCs for reduced costs. Partnership shows not only created savings for the breed club but also for the exhibitors, and this has definitely resulted in much improved entries for the general championship show. A similar situation was also seen at back-to-back shows where a breed club holds its championship show the day before or after a general show at a nearby venue. In some cases, the breed club had been able to have input into the choice of judge at the partner show, resulting in breed specialists judging at both events.

Other ways of trying to improve entries were discussed, such as the holding of social events, e.g. Dog of the Year and similar competitions where exhibitors would be able to attend two competitions on two days. Of course one size does not fit all but all of the above highlights the range of options available to breed clubs to support their members and make improvements to the numbers of dogs being exhibited.

Kathryn Mansfield, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The Kennel Club is very pleased with the positive and constructive way these discussions with the breed clubs have gone. The attendance was excellent and we would like to thank each and every breed club representative for taking the time and trouble to take part. We stressed that no decisions were being made on the day and that the clubs and councils in these 11 breeds have until the end of January to let us know exactly how they think their CCs should be allocated. We were very pleased to learn that some clubs were actually starting the amalgamation process while others are looking into the idea. For any clubs which choose this path, please know that the office will always provide information, support and advice.”

A press release regarding the new CC allocation model was issued on 20 October 2020 and is available on the Kennel Club website at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/CCallocation.

Please direct all enquiries about the CC allocation to email sass@thekennelclub.org.uk.

CRUFTS CHANGES

Following the announcement that Crufts 2021 will take place next year on the new dates of 15 - 18 July 2021 at the NEC Birmingham, The Kennel Club has now published some further details on some of the competitions and qualifications for next year’s show.

The Kennel Club will be reviewing many aspects of the show in line with government advice and the evolving health situation, however, some decisions have needed to be made in advance to ensure it would be able to go ahead in a Covid secure way.  The qualification is open to those who qualified for Crufts 2020 apart from the 3rd placing in class. It should be also noted no puppy classes will be scheduled at the 2021 show due to lack of opportunity to qualify.

Further to a review of the floor space and the number of exhibitors and attendees, the decision has had to be made that entries will be capped for all breeds.  Entries are due to open at the end of March and will be online only. Entries will close on 31 May 2021 or when numbers have been reached.

It is with great disappointment that The Kennel Club must also announce that, due to the lack of opportunity to qualify, the following competitions will not be taking place at Crufts 2021: Breeders’ competition, International Junior Handling competition, Junior Warrant competition, Vulnerable Breeds competition and Pets as Therapy Stakes.  Further information on other competitions and canine disciplines will be announced as soon as possible.

For further information on qualifications, and to keep up to date on how the Crufts 2021 show will look, please go to crufts.org.uk

Please note that it is hoped that Crufts 2022 will take place on 10 - 13 March. Any shows that take place between 25 January and 31 May 2021 will qualify for Crufts 2022, further details of which will be advised in due course.

REGULATIONS FOR JUDGE REQUIREMENTS AND ELIGIBILITY AS OF 1 JANUARY 2021

Further to the press statement of 24 February 2020 announcing the resumption of the Judges Education Programme (JEP) in tandem with the traditional routes for judges approval to award CCs, the Kennel Club has introduced regulations to support the introduction of the JEP including judge requirements and eligibility as of 1 January 2021, it has been announced.

In line with these new regulations and as previously announced, breeds clubs will be required to:

  • Appoint a Breed Education Coordinator (BEC) who will oversee the education of judges for the breed and work alongside all breed clubs and/or the breed council
  • Hold a Breed Appreciation Day (BAD) at least once every two years. Clubs may combine efforts to stage such events with other breed clubs if necessary
  • Select and promote at least two supported entry open shows for its breed at general or group open shows each year. A formal written agreement is to be reached with the licensed show societies, and the judges of such classes must be selected by the licensed show society from a list of at least two names proposed by the breed club and will be at either JEP Level 2 or Level 3 (or B list or A3 list). Regional breed clubs are advised to approach societies within their geographic area if possible

From 1 January 2021, no one can judge unless they meet JEP Level 1 requirements (existing CC judges excluded). The exception to this is where a valid contract was in place before the 24 February 2020 press announcement and the appointment complies with Kennel Club Regulation F(1)20.b.

To be able to judge more than three classes of a breed (four if a puppy class is scheduled) at any show or any number of classes at a championship show without CCs, a judge must be listed on a breed club/council B list or above or meet Level 2 requirements.  The criteria for breeds at Stud Book Band E have been rescinded.  All breeds now have the same class number criteria.

Full requirements for JEP Levels can be found at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/jep.

Eligibility to judge at each JEP Level

 

Level 1

 

  • Up to 3 classes (4 if a puppy class is scheduled) for any breed at Limited or Open Shows

Level 2

  • Unlimited number of classes for the respective breed at Limited, Open or Championship Shows (no CCs)
  • Any Variety classes, Groups and Best in Show at Limited Shows

Level 3

  • Unlimited number of classes for the respective breed at Limited, Open or Championship Shows (no CCs)
  • Any Variety classes Groups and Best in Show at Limited Shows

Level 4

  • Award Challenge Certificates in the respective breed
  • Any Variety classes, Groups and Best in Show at Open and Limited Shows

Judges are reminded that on accepting an appointment they must ensure that their name is included on a relevant breed council/club judges list or that they meet the appropriate level of the JEP. In the case of the latter, judges are asked to keep records to support their JEP level.

The Kennel Club advises societies to use the following wording within future judging contracts: “In accepting this appointment I confirm that I comply with the requirements of Kennel Club Regulation F(1)20b or the Judges Education Programme (Breed Shows)”.

The new regulations will be published in due course. All enquiries should be directed to email judges.education@thekennelclub.org.uk.

GUARANTEED CHAMPIONSHIP SHOWS FROM 2022 EXTENDED TO CLUBS AMALGAMATING IN PAST FIVE YEARS

Following the announcement in September that clubs which amalgamate will be guaranteed a Championship show for a period of at least ten years, The Kennel Club has confirmed that the assurance will also apply for those clubs which have already amalgamated in the past five years.

The Kennel Club Board has confirmed that the guarantee of championship status for ten years will commence from 2022 for both those clubs which have already amalgamated and those which do so in the coming year or so.

The following breed clubs will be guaranteed championship status for at least ten years from 2022 (year of amalgamation in brackets):

Midland & Eastern Counties Welsh Corgi Club (2020)

South West Welsh Corgi Club (2019)

Pennines Bulldog Club (2019)

Sovereign Pekingese Association (2017)

Birmingham Invicta Pekingese Club (2016)

Pekingese Club of Scotland (2016)

Wales & West of England Pekingese Association (2016)

Imperial Pekingese Association (2015)

London Reform Pekingese Association (2015)

Since the initial announcement was made, The Kennel Club is pleased that clubs across several breeds and a breed council have made enquiries requesting further information regarding this initiative.

The Kennel Club has made the offer of a guaranteed Championship show for ten years from 2022 as an incentive for breed clubs to amalgamate where appropriate for the breed, as part of its continued effort to energise dog showing in the UK.

The allocation of Challenge Certificates within a number of breeds is currently affected by a complex rotation system among breed clubs, which will no longer feature under the planned new model for CC allocation from 2024 onwards, as was announced last month. The Kennel Club is holding initial talks in the coming fortnight with those breed clubs where the new allocation may not be clear-cut, to work together to find a way forward for the breed club allocation.

The Kennel Club understands that some long established clubs might be very reluctant to consider amalgamation due to their long histories, but an amalgamation will help preserve the club’s heritage instead of the club risking folding if their breed numbers continue to decline.

Breed club amalgamations have recently taken place in the two Welsh Corgi breeds, where four clubs have merged to become two. The Pembroke breed in particular has seen a reduction in show entries in recent years in contrast to the era when the breed had a very high profile due to its connection to the Royal family.

Joy Whitehead, Secretary of the Midland and Eastern Counties Welsh Corgi Club, said: “The Midland and Eastern Counties Welsh Corgi clubs’ proposed merger has very recently been confirmed and will take place after the Midland’s final championship show next spring, Covid allowing.

“Our merger was deemed necessary due to falling exhibitor numbers, difficulty in finding committee members and the possibility that a merged club may be allowed CCs each year. This was important in that, every champ show year clubs were noticeably in a better financial position than in years with no CC allocation due to better entries in the main. The fact that The Kennel Club have now confirmed the new CC allocation each year for merged clubs is most beneficial and must be an excellent reason for breed clubs to consider merging.

“Mergers are not that easy but, given due diligence, necessary meetings and common sense, should be within any two clubs’ capacity to accomplish. The Kennel Club will always help.”

Kathryn Mansfield, Kennel Club Secretary said: “We are pleased that clubs and councils across other breeds have taken the initiative in approaching The Kennel Club for guidance and information on how they might follow suit. We are keen to work together with those clubs which are considering amalgamation and we lend our full support to those that do, not least through the offer of guaranteed Championship status for at least ten years.

“This offer, along with the planned CC allocation model, are important developments for the future of dog showing and we hope that it will have a positive impact on the sport, its exhibitors and show societies."

For further information regarding the amalgamation process, please contact the Societies and Show Services department at the Kennel Club on 01296 318540 or email sass@thekennelclub.org.uk.

UPDATE ON CANINE HEALTH SCHEMES AS ENGLAND ENTERS SECOND NATIONAL LOCKDOWN

In light of the national four-week lockdown that began in England last week (5 November), the British Veterinary Association (BVA) and The Kennel Club (KC) have announced the following changes to the Canine Health Schemes (CHS) in order to follow the new guidelines and restrictions, and also continue to process submissions.

As of Thursday 5 November, the CHS office is closed and the team are working remotely.

Impact on veterinary practices

England: As part of BVA’s guidance to veterinary practices, how practices are able to operate and which services they will be able to offer in terms of health testing will be dependent on individual practice factors such as staffing levels, building layout, as well as the vets’ professional and clinical judgement, and we would urge all owners to respect their individual vet’s decisions in this matter.

Wales: At the end of the firebreak lockdown (9 November), practices in Wales will be able to deliver veterinary services in line with Covid-safe requirements. However, during the England national lockdown, CHS is only able to process online submissions to the Hip and Elbow Schemes (see below).

Scotland and Northern Ireland: Veterinary practices are able to deliver veterinary services in line with Covid-safe requirements so x-rays and eye screening can go ahead. However, during the England national lockdown, CHS is only able to process online submissions to the Hip and Elbow Schemes.

Eye Scheme 

In England, under the new guidance for the national lockdown, group screening cannot take place. In Scotland, NI, and Wales (after the firebreak lockdown) group screenings can go ahead but Panellists must adhere to additional requirements to work in a Covid-safe manner. Some CHS Eye Panellists may be able to offer eye screenings as long as government guidance on working safely, practice polices, and any local restrictions are adhered to.

We are asking all animal owners and breeders to respect their vets’ clinical and professional judgement and be patient during this time. The list of eye panellists offering testing can be found at: www.bva.co.uk/canine-health-schemes/eye-scheme/find-an-eye-panellist/

Hip and Elbow Dysplasia Schemes

As the CHS processing team is based in London, during the England national lockdown, processing and scoring of hip and elbow submissions will be as follows:

Online submissions:

·         Hip and elbow submissions can be made by a veterinary surgeon via the CHS online portal

·         The CHS team can process and score online submissions, however, online scoring is slower than in-person scoring, and this means there will be reduced capacity for scoring during the lockdown

·         Unfortunately, this will further impact turnaround times and both BVA and The Kennel Club ask for your patience

Postal submissions:

·         CHS cannot score postal submissions during the national lockdown in England

·         CHS can process postal submissions, ready for them to be allocated to an in-person scoring session after the national lockdown. Unfortunately, this will impact turnaround times, which CHS is unable to estimate until the office reopens

·         CHS is asking veterinary practices to assist by not sending postal submissions during lockdown as there is already a significant backlog of submissions that are unable to be scored until the offices reopen. Consequently vets are advised to hold on to submissions if at all possible

Anyone presenting dogs for hip or elbow x-Ray for submission to the Canine Health Schemes at this current time is advised to confirm that their vet is able to submit these via the online portal.

Turnaround times

Due to the uncertainty caused by the national lockdown in England, the CHS team are currently not able to provide accurate turnaround times. The team is working hard to process and score online submissions in order of date received and is unable to fast-track any submissions.

BVA and the KC is asking all owners and breeders to please respect the CHS team and their vets’ clinical and professional judgement and to be patient during this time.

Payment

CHS is unable to take payment until the submission is received, so please wait for at least two weeks before calling to make payment.

To make a payment by card for postal submissions, please call the office on 020 7908 6380 (please note that this line is for payments only).

When calling please provide the following information: Date of radiography; Kennel Club/microchip number; name and address of the veterinary practice.

Contacting CHS

For all non-payment related enquiries, please email chs@bva.co.uk and if possible include the dog’s Kennel Club or microchip number, date of radiography, and the name and address of your vet practice. The team will get back to you as soon as possible.

The BVA, Kennel Club and CHS teams thank you for your patience and understanding in these exceptional circumstances.

For the latest guidance and advice on Covid-19, please visit the BVA coronavirus information hub: www.bva.co.uk/coronavirus/ and The Kennel Club breeder and health testing FAQ pages: www.thekennelclub.org.uk/coronavirus. If you have any questions or concerns relating to canine health and welfare, please email health@thekennelclub.org.uk

CAPPING OF ENTRIES AT SHOWS DURING THE PANDEMIC

In order to make it easier for show societies to comply with government guidelines, especially social distancing, during the current pandemic, the Kennel Club Board following a recommendation from the Show Executive Committee (SEC) has agreed to relax show regulations to allow for the capping of entries, it has been announced.

Regulations F(4)a and F(4)b have been relaxed in the first instance until 31 July 2021 to allow entries to be capped.

Regulation F4.a.

Championship shows – which are open to all exhibitors (except where a qualification for entry has been approved by the Board of the Kennel Club) and at which Kennel Club Challenge Certificates are offered. (Vide Kennel Club Show Regulation F(1))

Regulation F4.b.

Open shows – which are open to all exhibitors. (Vide Kennel Club Show Regulation F(1))

In making the recommendation, the SEC pointed out that the capping of entries was not mandatory, but is an option along with other arrangements such as confirmed start times for breeds so that exhibitors do not have to wait around for their judging and can then leave the venue once their judging is complete. It should be noted that publication of schedules may need to be delayed to ensure the most up-to-date information is available including the method used for capping the entry.

The SEC also pointed out the following:

  • It is recommended that the cap be worked out based on a percentage of the breed’s entry at the previous year’s show. However, the method decided upon would be at the discretion of the show management and clearly publicised to exhibitors
  • Where societies make use of show printers which have provision to allow for capping, it is recommended to discuss this with the printer
  • Postal entries do not have to be accepted. If societies are not accepting postal entries the earliest published closing date should be used when considering class eligibility
  • At shows which host partnership shows, it may be necessary for the partnership show to also have a capped entry to ensure social distancing guidelines are complied with. Both societies should discuss this prior to the release of their show schedules

Kathryn Mansfield, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We live in extraordinary times which require extraordinary measures, which is why the show regulations surrounding the capping of entries at shows have been relaxed until midway through next year. It is very much hoped that societies will take a sensible approach to this relaxation, allowing people an enjoyable day out while keeping all participants safe, which of course is the main priority for us all.”

More information and FAQs are available on the Kennel Club website. Please go to the following page, scroll to the bottom and click on the ‘dog showing’ tab: bit.ly/3m9NkoM.

All queries from societies regarding the capping of entries should be directed to breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk.

BALLOT COUNTING SERVICES FOR KENNEL CLUB REGISTERED SOCIETIES

The Kennel Club has previously offered a ballot counting service to registered societies, to assist with elections of committee, officers, judges and so on. Under the current circumstances we are aware that many societies would like to be able to conduct ballots, but do not have the resources, and furthermore the Kennel Club has been unable to offer the usual postal ballot counting service, due to office closure and the consequent effect on processing of post.

We are therefore delighted to announce that we have made arrangements with Mi-Voice, the company which runs election / balloting processes in conjunction with Kennel Club General Meetings, to offer a range of services to registered societies. This will enable either fully electronic, or part electronic and part postal submissions, and will ensure complete confidentiality for the user.

Kathryn Mansfield, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The Kennel Club very much hopes that registered societies will be able to make good use of this service if they need to. This period of lockdown is a very testing time for all of us, but the Kennel Club is doing its best to assist clubs and societies where it is able. For example, we have developed operational plans for licensed events, relaxed show regulations, created a number of FAQ documents on our website and extended annual return deadlines. The Board is continuing to meet on a regular basis throughout the current pandemic, as are all its associated committees, and a number of additional measures will also be announced in the coming weeks as we strive to assist societies as best we can during this uncertain time.”

Mi-Voice are able to offer a response handling and ballot count service to Kennel Club registered societies. Ballot papers can be returned to Mi-Voice by post, where the experienced elections team will process responses, conduct a count and provide a result report. These are the same services previously offered by the Kennel Club, and would be provided at the same rate as the existing pricing structure.

In addition, Mi-Voice can assist with distributing voting information by post and/or email, create an online voting site for elections, and even take votes over the telephone. These Mi-Voice services will be familiar to members who participate in the Kennel Club AGM and SGM process.

If a conversation is of interest please contact Mi-Voice by email at enquiries@mi-voice.com or telephone 02380 763 987.

 

THE KENNEL CLUB PLANS TO USE NEW MODEL FOR CC ALLOCATION FROM 2024 ONWARDS: SOME BREED CLUBS TO BE OFFERED A SECOND SET OF CCs IN A YEAR

The Kennel Club plans to introduce a new model when allocating Challenge Certificates (CCs) for shows held from 2024 onwards, it has been announced.

In some cases breed clubs which hold well-supported championship shows will be offered a second set of CCs in a year in a move designed to give a boost to the show scene and provide more opportunities for specialists to judge at CC level.

It is estimated that the implementation of the new model for the 2024-2028 period would result in 20 breeds retaining their present number of sets of CCs, while 39 breeds would lose one or more sets at group and general shows. However, 104 breeds would gain one or more sets at breed club and/or group and general shows. 

The CC allocation is based upon breed entry figures in preceding years coupled with the need to have a fair geographic spread of CCs throughout the UK.

The existing model was last fully applied for the 2014 allocation and is now out of date, with many anomalies, for example the lowest entry breed does not have the lowest CC allocation. The creation in 2019 of the new ‘all breeds’ shows, which caused the minimum number of CCs on offer in some of the numerically smaller breeds to rise from seven to twelve, has highlighted the need for a new model, which is now being introduced.

Many breeds are now ‘off the existing scale’, as some with increased entries have had none or too few CCs allocated, while other breeds have experienced decreased entries but no CCs have been withdrawn. This means that breeds, exhibitors and shows are not being treated proportionately across the board. To apply the existing model to breeds would result in a net loss of 352 sets of CCs across the championship show scene.

The new model will be based on average numbers of dogs entered at shows over a five-year period, and the CC model and stud book bands will be linked together.

The key objectives of this new approach include sustainability and transparency of the allocation; fairness across all breeds; the potential to boost entries; separate allocations for breed clubs and general societies; encouragement of partnership shows with associated cost reductions for organisers and exhibitors. The latter point has the potential to be a major consideration when the show scene returns to normal in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Entry data will now be published annually and along with the model can be used as an early warning system to indicate where action is needed to maintain entries and consequently the breed’s CC allocation. Similarly, the system can be used to indicate where a breed is on the point of moving up to the next stage where an increase in CCs is possible. As the allocation will be in five-year periods, breeds will have more time to increase entries and influence their CC allocation, and shows will have more time to plan ahead. It is hoped that this transparent approach will inspire clubs to strive for improvement.

The Board has directed that there will be no reduction in the number of CCs available at breed club level in the 2024-2028 round. However, from the data provided with this press release, breeds can see where the breed club allocation would have been reduced. 

The Kennel Club has announced that the offer of ‘joint’ show allocations in a handful of breeds will cease from 2024 and the rotation of CCs at breed club level will no longer feature in the new way forward. The Kennel Club will be in talks with breed clubs where the new allocation may not be clear-cut, to work together to find a way forward for the breed club allocation. This follows last month’s announcement of an offer of a guaranteed championship show for a period of at least ten years as an incentive for breed clubs to amalgamate where appropriate for the breed.

Kathryn Mansfield, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “It is only right that all breeds should be treated fairly when CCs are allocated, which is why it was necessary to review the model we use to decide the number of CCs available for each breed. In this round there will be no reduction in the number of CCs allocated to breed clubs but additional CCs will be allocated, with the positive result that new clubs could be offered a championship show and some clubs will be offered a second championship show in a year.

“As with any undertaking of this size, we appreciate that the ‘devil will be in the detail’. In this respect, we know we are going to have to enter into dialogue with some breed clubs but please rest assured we will do so with a sympathetic ear.”

The most recent CC allocation covers 2019-2023 for general and group shows and 2022/2023 for breed clubs. The full allocation to clubs and general and group championship shows using the new model is expected to be announced during the first quarter of 2021. To this end the Kennel Club will NOT expect clubs to apply for championship status as in previous years. The Kennel Club will notify clubs and societies individually of their championship status.

 

ANNUAL RETURNS DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 31 JULY 2021

The Kennel Club has extended the deadline for submission of annual returns to 31 July 2021, in order to allow clubs and societies which have been unable to hold an AGM in 2020 to do so in 2021.

It remains necessary for an AGM to be held for each year to allow for formal approval and confirmation of business by members. However, a society may hold both the 2020 and 2021 AGM on the same day, one after the other, and then submit both sets of annual returns.

Please also see the FAQs available on the Kennel Club website at bit.ly/2GJQgsX.

All queries regarding the submission of annual returns should be directed to email sass@thekennelclub.org.uk

 

UPDATE REGARDING CRUFTS 2021 

The Kennel Club and the Crufts Committee are committed to holding Crufts 2021 if permitted to do so by the Government.

We greatly appreciate the support the show receives each year from our exhibitors, sponsors, trade-stand holders, public visitors and Channel 4.

The qualification criteria for the show will be announced once the Government guidance is clear on future events, which may not be until the autumn.

It may be that the show will need to be reformatted in a way to comply with new regulations. If so, more details about this will be announced as information becomes available.

We would ask for patience at what is a difficult time for everyone with limited information currently available as to how things will progress in the coming weeks and months.

Crufts is the world’s best known celebration of dogs and we very much look forward to welcoming you all to the show in happier times in 2021, if circumstances allow.

 

CRUFTS IS BACK – AND IT’S ONLY JUNE!

Following the success of the Crufts television programmes in March, Sunset and Vine together with Channel 4 are releasing five extra Crufts programmes, the first one being shown on the 20th June.

These five, one-hour archive Crufts specials hosted by Clare Balding will be celebrating the amazing human and canine relationship that Crufts demonstrates each year, showing how incredible dogs are and all that they can do, as well as highlighting some great moments and memories from Crufts over the Channel 4 years.

The first two films will be shown on the 20th and 27th June respectively and will be the A-Z of Crufts and Happy Dogs. The A-Z of Crufts will include some of the best stories and action packed drama of the past ten years of Crufts. Happy Dogs will follow and contains a blend of show-time archives with self-shot segments from the Crufts on-screen team that will also give viewers tips on how to entertain and look after their dogs at home, especially while people aren’t getting out as often as usual.

Starting mid July, programming will begin again with three more films. These include Crufts goes Walkies, which covers the wonderful relationship dogs share with humans, and Flying dogs, a one hour special that relives Flyball at Crufts and some behind the scene features. The programmes will finish with the finale, Crufts Best of Best in Show. This one-off show will feature original archive footage and imagery of Crufts over the 20th and 21st century packed with beautiful dogs and incredible stories, a real celebration of what it means to win Crufts Best in Show and also what it means to be involved in Crufts.

David Stranks, Crufts Executive Producer from Sunset and Vine said; “Every year Channel 4 looks forward to entertaining millions of viewers with its Crufts coverage. Sunset and Vine are very excited to have been able to work with Channel 4 and Clare Balding to bring back some of the excitement viewers felt in March back into their homes and are grateful to have received the support from the Kennel Club in producing these five extra hours of programming.”

Vanessa McAlpine, Crufts Show Manager commented; “We were delighted to help Sunset and Vine with the new Crufts programme and have loved watching the shows. They not only reflect what makes Crufts so special, but many within the dog world will enjoy reliving some of the special moments Crufts has brought over the years. For the general viewer we also hope that these programmes will offer some handy tips and serve as a good introduction to all the fun activities to get involved in with dogs.”

For further details on the programmes including times and dates please go to bit.ly/2vyJ7G0.

 

 

 

Kennel Club services accessible online

The following Kennel Club services are all accessible online (due to the closure of both our London and Aylesbury offices we are unable to accept postal applications until further notice):

Breeders and coronavirus (Covid-19) FAQs

Last updated: Thursday 19 March 2020

Given the rapidly changing situation, please regularly check the latest Public Health England advice and continually assess your own situation based on this information. The Kennel Club is in regular contact with Defra to keep up to date on developments.

Government guidance on self-isolation and social distancing is available on the GOV.UK website:

We are expecting advice and guidance from Defra shortly, but in the meantime we are trying to answer your questions below:

I have a litter of puppies due. What is the advice about visiting families?

Government advice is to avoid non-essential travel and contact, so if you have a litter of puppies the best way to keep in contact with and update new owners is by phone, email, video calls, and sending photos, rather than visits to your home.

When face to face contact is essential, for example owners collecting the puppy, take extra hygiene precautions and follow government advice depending on your and the new owner’s situation.

How can people socialise their puppies at this time?

Of course it’s more difficult to socialise puppies at this time. Some practical tips you can do at home to help socialise your pups include:

  • Play different sounds to them via your phone or computer, like traffic noises, dog barks, other animal noises, and anything else your pups might not be experiencing in real life while we are staying at home more.
  • Make additional efforts to get them outside in your garden to experience as many sights and sounds as possible, but at a safe distance for you and others around you.
  • Get them used to different environments and everyday situations where you can, for example hoover around them, show them the washing machine while it’s on.

We were planning a litter but should we now delay this? / is it still ok to breed from your dog?

This has to be personal decision, based on your situation, but do consider the difficulties around socialising puppies in the current climate, the potential of you getting poorly and not being able to care for your puppies or dogs, whether your local vet will be able to assist if needed and how to deal with prospective owners responsibly when all but essential contact and travel is advised, and the situation is changing rapidly.

 

How can I best take care of my puppies and dogs during this period?

It’s important to follow government advice depending on your situation. If you have symptoms of the virus and feel unwell, the advice is to self-isolate and this includes physical contact with your dog/s and/or puppies – as hard as it may be. If you live alone and become unwell and need to self-isolate, a friend or family member may be able to care for your dog/s and/or puppies for you, but let them know in advance that you are self-isolating and follow government guidelines around this when handing over your dog.

Otherwise, if you are following social distancing measures, take extra hygiene precautions; try to avoid your puppies or dogs licking your face, keep your puppies as clean as you can and always wash your hands with soap and water after touching them, preparing their food, and cleaning their sleeping and toileting area.

Make sure anyone in your household where you are rearing the puppies follows these measures, or those who are caring for your puppies if you can’t. There is no evidence that dogs can get or transmit Covid-19, but these measures are to reduce the likelihood of your pet spreading the disease through environmental contamination on their fur – so it’s essential to increase hygiene precautions.

Keep your puppies mentally and physically active – start training early, play hide and seek games and let your puppies socialise with each other in the home and outdoors, where you can.

Will vets still be on hand to assist if something goes wrong?

Government advice, regardless of if you are showing symptoms, is to avoid non-essential travel and contact, so if your dog or puppy needs vet care during this period, call your vet in the first instance. Don’t leave the house to go to your vet if you are self-isolating.

 

What should I do if I need to get my puppies vaccinated or microchipped?

Speak to your vet to ask them what they recommend.

 

Is it safe for someone else to take care of dogs that I breed from if I'm taken ill or have to self-isolate?

A friend, family member or professional kennels likely can care for your dog or dogs for you, but let them know in advance that if you are self-isolating and follow government guidelines around this when handing over your dog/s. Always wash your hands before and after handling your dog/s and preparing their food, and ask whoever cares for your dog/s to do so as well.

There is also support and help available from various online, local communities and charities including The Cinnamon Trust - a specialist national charity that helps the elderly to look after their much-loved and much-needed companion animals. They have a network of over 17,000 volunteers all over the UK who help owners provide vital loving care for their pets and help keep them together - be this through walking dogs or fostering when owners might be in hospital. During this time of uncertainty their volunteers are on hand to help the elderly or vulnerable that might be in self-isolation or feeling poorly and can’t get out.

 

 

CORRESPONDING WITH THE KENNEL CLUB DURING COVID-19 OUTBREAK

Clubs and societies are advised by the Kennel Club that, in order to assist in dealing with correspondence efficiently, it should preferably be sent to the Kennel Club by email rather than by post during the current COVID-19 outbreak.

Correspondence posted to the Kennel Club may result in a delayed response as the offices are currently closed, with staff working remotely.

In view of societies having their Annual General Meeting delayed, the Kennel Club will allow the late submission of annual returns depending on when meetings are able to be held.

With regard to the above matters, the Kennel Club will allow sufficient leeway and no penalties will be incurred as long as there is a realistic and reasonable approach all round.

For clubs and societies which use the Kennel Club’s scrutineering service and which have ballots currently running, the provision of results cannot be guaranteed until the situation surrounding the outbreak becomes more stable.

Any clubs and societies which have booked this service for ballots which have yet to begin should put these on hold for the time being or an alternative scrutineering method should be used in urgent cases, as the Kennel Club cannot guarantee the service at present.

For any queries relating to annual returns and show licensing, including cancellation and postponement, please email sass@thekennelclub.org.uk.

Societies submitting correspondence relating to judges, including nominations and questionnaires for Challenge Certificate judges should, wherever possible, submit these via email to breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk or for activity disciplines to wda@thekennelclub.org.uk.

If this is not possible, these nominations will be dealt with once the Kennel Club offices are open for business as usual. Leeway will be granted if submissions are within the required 12-month period.

The Kennel Club thanks all clubs and societies for their patience and understanding during these difficult times.

 

Statement on COVID-19 and Kennel Club events – 17/03/2020

The safety and security of competitors, spectators, volunteers and staff at Kennel Club events is of paramount importance. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Kennel Club has taken the decision with regret to recommend strongly that Clubs and Societies cancel forthcoming events over the next three months, i.e. until the end of June.
This is based on advice issued by the Government yesterday, March 16, to restrict non-essential travel and contact, and in consideration of the many vulnerable groups who both attend and participate in Kennel Club events. In addition, the Kennel Club recommends that alternative arrangements are put in place regarding other activities such as meetings, seminars and training classes.
Advice on the situation regarding COVID-19 is changing daily and we strongly suggest that Clubs and Societies keep aware of updates as issued by the Department of Health at www.gov.uk/government/topical-events/coronavirus-covid-19-uk-government-response.
Further announcements will also be posted on the Kennel Club website at https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/press-releases/2020/march/statement-on-kennel-club-events-and-coronavirus-covid-19 as well as on the Kennel Club’s various social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter.
Thank you for your patience and understanding at this time.

 

Judging Regulations and Code of Best Practice

This page is to be read in conjunction with the Kennel Club press release issued on 24 July 2019. Changes to regulations are noted in bold. 

Amended Regulation F10

Judging

Judges at Kennel Club licensed shows must judge in accordance with Kennel Club Breed Standards and Show Regulations.  In assessing dogs, judges must penalise any features or exaggerations which they consider would be detrimental to the soundness, health or well-being of the dog.  Judges are also expected to act impartially, with integrity and to only judge on the merits of the dogs in competition and consider no other factors.  Judges must maintain and abide by the highest standards in accordance with Kennel Club Rules and Regulations and appropriate Codes of Best Practice as published from time to time.

Code of Best Practice for Judges – supporting statements – Chapter 1

  1. Judges must reject any opportunity to take personal advantage of positions offered or bestowed upon them. N.B. judges may be paid fees, reimbursed for travel and receive food and accommodation.

Grey areas

  1. There will always be ‘grey areas’ that may confuse judges. When faced with a dilemma ask yourself whether the situation, however innocent, projects an outward appearance of impropriety.  A good rule of thumb is ‘if you have concerns about whether something is inappropriate, you probably should avoid the situation.’
  1. Judges are often singled out for critical observation by others. Therefore, always keep in mind that perfectly innocent actions or statements can be misconstrued.  This includes but is not restricted to participation in public forums and on social media. 
  1. Actions that bring embarrassment to the Kennel Club, fellow judges or the canine world in general could be subject to disciplinary action which could affect future judging privileges.
  1. As a judge you will be invited to attend social functions such as club dinners where exhibitors will be present. Take care to avoid even the appearance of impropriety with anyone who might appear in your ring.  You may occasionally find that you will have to tactfully change the subject or excuse yourself from a conversation that involves breeds or exhibitors whom you are likely to judge.
  1. All these aspects of avoiding the appearance of impropriety include taking part in any social media discussion. Judges must avoid social media discussion about dogs or breeds ahead of or after a judging appointment.  Taking part in discussion on a breed or worse a particular dog or dogs ahead of or after a judging appointment is unacceptable and could lead to disciplinary action.  
  1. Ahead of an appointment judges should always be circumspect in their interactions with potential exhibitors to avoid the perception of impropriety and/or bias. Exhibitors expect a level playing field and mixing socially with potential exhibitors should be avoided.
  1. Similarly, you must avoid travelling to shows with an exhibitor or accepting invitations to stay overnight with an exhibitor whose dogs you are likely to judge.
  1. With common sense, judges can easily avoid a situation which might raise ethical questions.
  1. Whenever you have a question about a judging procedure or conduct, consult the Kennel Club, which should be the first port of call to discuss questions concerning best practice as a judge.

New and amended Regulations

F(1)20 – Judges and Judging

New sub-paragraphs and amendments to existing regulations

e. A judge must not alter the ownership of a dog in order to allow that dog to be entered for exhibition at a show where that judge is officiating.

f. Judges may not enter, exhibit, prepare a dog for exhibition or handle a dog in the ring at a Show at which they are officiating (vide F(1)29a(9))

p. A judge must request that a dog be withdrawn from competition if the judge has a conflict of interest with the dog and/or its owner.

F(1)29 Disqualification and Forfeit of Awards

a. A dog may be disqualified by the Board from any award, whether an objection has been lodged or not, if proven amongst other things to have been:

(9) Entered or exhibited for competition, or handled in the ring by a Judge of dogs at that Show.

(11) Registered or recorded as owned by the scheduled Judge or any member of his/her immediate household or immediate family within a period of twelve months prior to the Show.  This shall not apply to dogs owned by a Judge appointed in an emergency.

(12)Handled at a show, boarded or prepared for exhibition within the previous twelve months by the scheduled Judge or any member of his/her immediate household or immediate family.  This shall not apply to a Judge appointed in an emergency.

Code of Best Practice for Judges – supporting statements – Chapter 1

  1. Definition of ‘member of immediate family’ extends to first and second generations.

For example:

  • a dog cannot be exhibited under a judge if it has been registered or recorded as owned by the judge or the judge’s spouse or child or anyone permanently residing with the judge within 12 months of the show.
  • a dog cannot be exhibited if it has been handled at a show, boarded or prepared for exhibition by the scheduled judge or the judge’s spouse or child or any one permanently residing with the judge within 12 months of the show.

F(1)8 Entry for Exhibition

New sub paragraphs

An entry must not be made at any show under a judge of any dog where said judge or any member of his/her immediate household or immediate family has been known to have owned, handled at a show, boarded or prepared such dog for exhibition within 12 months prior to the Show.  This regulation shall not apply to judges appointed in an emergency.

j. An entry must not be made at any show under a judge of any dog where said judge has bred the dog. This Regulation shall not apply to judges appointed in an emergency.

k. An exhibitor must not enter or exhibit a dog under a judge which creates a conflict of interest between the dog, exhibitor and/or judge.

Code of Best Practice for Judges – supporting statements Chapter 1

  1. Judges start in the sport as breeders and exhibitors. It is natural to want to continue these activities after becoming a judge. Exhibiting and judging can be combined without a problem if the judge is prudent as to how and when to exhibit. If a judge chooses to exhibit as well as judge he/she should expect to be the subject of scrutiny.
  1. A judge should never transfer a dog to someone for the sole purpose of permitting the dog to be exhibited at shows at which you are officiating.
  1. A conflict of interest exists when a judge could be said to be influenced by any relationship or factor other than the merit or performance of the dog for example – **a family member, immediate household, financial considerations, employer or employee relationships, separate interest in a kennel name, co-owns a dog with the judge. (This is not a definitive list)
  1. In the event of a dog declared Best of Breed and having to be withdrawn from the Group competition due to a conflict of interest, the dog could be invited to do a lap of honour before the group judging starts.
  1. It is as much the responsibility of an exhibitor as it is a judge to as far as possible ensure that dog shows are seen to be competitions which are conducted on a level playing field.
  1. An exhibitor must decline to enter or exhibit under a judge where it might reasonably appear that the judges’ placings could be based on something other than the merits or performance of the dog.
  1. The responsibility for entering a dog rests with the exhibitor who should not enter a dog which is ineligible under KC Show Regulations or that the entry could create a conflict of interest between the judge and the exhibitor. Awards won maybe disqualified and exhibitors with repeat breaches of regulations may receive other disciplinary penalties.

 

 

KENNEL CLUB AND BVA ANNOUNCE CHANGES TO CHS EYE SCHEME FOR 2020

Following consultation with the Eye Panel Working Party, the Kennel Club (KC) and British Veterinary Association (BVA) have announced the following changes to the Canine Health Schemes (CHS) BVA/KC/International Sheepdog Society (ISDS) Eye Scheme, effective from 1st January 2020:

Removal of Schedule B

  • Schedule B will be removed. The CHS ‘sightings report’, which records and monitors evidence of conditions and abnormalities, will be used to add and remove breeds to and from Schedule A. These reports have been collated by the Eye Panel Working Party alongside Schedule B for five years and will now be reviewed annually, allowing continued monitoring of the incidence of any conditions across all breeds.
  • Where evidence of new and emerging conditions has been noted via the sightings report, breeds may be considered for addition to Schedule A, and where no reports of affected dogs have been noted for a period of five years, breeds may be considered for removal from Schedule A.
  • Due to evidence of an established condition, the following breeds currently listed on Schedule B will be added to Schedule A: Border Collie (Goniodysgenesis/primary glaucoma), French Bulldog (Hereditary cataracts early onset), Hungarian Vizsla (Goniodysgenesis/primary glaucoma), Papillon (Generalised progressive retinal atrophy), and Golden Retriever (Goniodysgenesis/primary glaucoma).
  • Remaining breeds currently listed on Schedule B have had very few reports of associated eye conditions and so will no longer be listed, as evidence suggests that the breed is not, at this time, predisposed to the condition.
  • Wording on the eye certificates, which have recently been redesigned, will be amended to more accurately reflect the heredity of eye condition. This will enable any dog to now participate in the Eye Scheme and, in the case of KC registered dogs, have the result recorded in the Breed Record Supplement (BRS) and on the KC Health Test Results Finder online.

Change to recommended frequency of eye screening

  • For KC Assured Breeders, all breeds on Schedule A must be eye screened within 12 months prior to the date of mating. The Assured Breeder Scheme rules will be altered to ensure that they accurately reflect this.

Publication of Multifocal Retinal Dysplasia results

  • Multifocal Retinal Dysplasia results will be published in the BRS and KC Health Test Results Finder online, rather than on an open register. Health test results will no longer be referred to as ‘pass’ or ‘fail’, but rather ‘affected’ or ‘unaffected’.

Bill Lambert, Senior Health and Welfare Manager at the Kennel Club commented: “Collaboratively with the BVA and the Eye Panel Working Party, we have agreed that Schedule B is removed as it no longer serves a reasonable purpose. We now have improved ways to more effectively monitor eye conditions in all breeds with an annual sightings report, which has run alongside the scheme for five years now.

“Many breeders will welcome the opportunity to participate in the scheme and have the results published on the Kennel Club Health Tests Results Finder regardless of whether their breed appears on Schedule A. Any abnormalities collated in this sightings report will be reviewed annually by the Eye Panel Working Party, providing continual surveillance of the incidence of any new and emerging conditions in any breed, and assisting breeders in making sensible breeding decisions that promote good dog health.”

BVA President, Daniella Dos Santos said: “The annual sightings report means we now have five years of data on which dogs are most affected by hereditary eye diseases. We hope the removal of Schedule B will make it easier for breeders to recognise and test the breeds that are most likely to be affected by these diseases and we’ll continue to encourage routine eye screening for dogs of any breed, both purebred and crossbreed, both to ensure we have the most accurate data possible and to safeguard the health of the dogs involved.”

Further information about the CHS BVA/KC/ISDS Eye Scheme is available from both the KC and the BVA’s websites - www.thekennelclub.org.ukwww.bva.co.uk - or from the Kennel Club’s Health Team: health@thekennelclub.org.uk. FAQs about the changes to the scheme can be found at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/eye-scheme-questions.

The breeds currently listed on Schedule A can be found at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/health/breeding-for-health/complex-inherited-disorders/bvakc-health-schemes/bvakcisds-eye-scheme, and the Health Test Results Finder at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/mateselect/test.

 

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Kennel Club warns dog owners to make sure their microchip details are up to date in time for the fireworks season!

With Diwali and fireworks night coming up, the Kennel Club is warning pet owners to be extra vigilant following statistics that show that 71% of owners’ details on microchipping databases are inaccurate.

Petlog, run by the Kennel Club, is one of the largest databases for microchipped animals and one of the only databases where users can ensure the money spent on microchipping goes back into dogs. To give even greater peace of mind, the Kennel Club has the Petlog Premium upgrade which offers pet owners a comprehensive range of lost and found services, which ensures they maintain accurate contact details, so if the worst happens and their pet goes missing, they can go to the Petlog website and alert local authorised agents to help with their search.

Since compulsory microchipping was introduced in April 2016 approximately 90% of dogs are now microchipped, but statistics show that only 29%* of dogs have microchips with accurate contact details, meaning that should a pet go missing on nights such as fireworks night and is subsequently found and scanned, the reunification process won’t work. What dog owners also aren’t aware of is that it is now a legal requirement to ensure that contact details are kept up to date.

Jacquie Easton, Kennel Club Chief Operations Officer said: “Dogs can react very badly to the unfamiliar sights, sounds and even smells that are common on fireworks night – research shows that 40% of dogs are scared of fireworks. The experience can be terrifying for dogs and result in them behaving unpredictably which can put their safety at risk.

It is a good time of year to ensure that owners’ microchip details are up to date and by registering with Petlog owners can be reassured that their money is put back into rescue and welfare organisations which are being supported by the provision of free services to help the rehoming process.”

For more information on microchipping and Petlog go to www.petlog.org.uk.

Tips for fireworks night:

The Kennel Club recommends dog owners are prepared in time for fireworks night.

Do

  • Ensure your pet is microchipped (this is now and legal requirement) and that your details are up to date.
  • Keep a collar and ID tag on your dog, just in case they do accidentally escape.
  • Acclimatise your dog to noises prior to the big night. There are many noise CDs on the market which give you the opportunity to introduce your dog to a variety of potentially disturbing sounds in a controlled manner.
  • Seek help from an experienced animal behaviourist. If your pet is severely noise phobic, sound CDs may make the situation worse. Kennel Club Accredited Instructors are experienced in different aspects of dog training and behaviour.
  • Make a safe den for your dog to retreat to if he or she feels scared. Alternatively, let your dog take refuge under furniture and include an old, unwashed piece of clothing like a woolly jumper so that your dog can smell your scent and feel comfortable.
  • Distract your dog from the noise by having the TV or the radio switched on.
  • Try to act and behave as normal, as your dog will pick up on any odd behaviour. Remain calm, happy and cheerful as this will send positive signals to your dog. Reward calm behaviour with dog treats or playing with toys of interest.
  • Check where and when firework displays are being held in your local area. Also ask your neighbours to let you know if they are planning anything.
  • Consult your vet if your dog has any health problems or is taking any medication.
  • Talk to your vet about giving remedies such as Ceva Adaptil to help them cope with fireworks night, and always follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Feed your dog a while before you expect any disturbances, as once the fireworks start your dog may be too anxious to eat.
  • Walk your dog before dusk. It may be some time before it’s safe to venture outside again for your dog to relieve themselves. Bear in mind the smell of fireworks might also be destressing for your dog.
  • Make sure you shut all doors and windows in your home and don’t forget to draw the curtains. This will block out any scary flashes of light and reduce the noise level of fireworks. Don’t forget to block off cat flaps to stop dogs (and cats) escaping.
  • Secure your dog safely inside a room before opening the front door.
  • Your dog might choose to hide under the bed; if they come to you for comfort, make sure that you give it to them. Ignoring your dog will only make things worse as they will not understand your withdrawal from them.

Don’t

  • Take your dog to a firework display; even if your dog does not bark or whimper, don’t assume they are happy. Excessive yawning and panting can indicate that your dog is stressed.
  • Tie your dog up outside while fireworks are being let off. 
  • Assume your garden is escape proof. If your dog needs to go out keep him on a lead just in case.
  • Leave your dog on their own or in a separate room from you.
  • Try to force your dog to face its fears – it will just become more frightened.
  • Forget to top up the water bowl. Anxious dogs pant more and get thirsty.
  • Change routines more than necessary, as this can be stressful for some dogs.
  • Try and tempt them out if they do retreat, as this may cause more stress.
  • Tell your dog off. This will only make your pet more distressed. It is important to remember that it is natural for a dog to be scared of loud noises and unfamiliar sights and sounds.

*figures according to the Battersea report ‘Microchipping Two Years On – 2018