The Kennel Club is the UK’s largest organisation dedicated to the health and welfare of dogs. The Kennel Club was founded in 1873 and is able to offer dog owners an unparalleled source of information, experience and advice on dog welfare, dog health, dog training and dog breeding.

The Kennel Club, 1-5 Clarges Street, Piccadilly, London W1J 8AB
Telephone: 01296 318540

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The Kennel Club, 4a Alton House, Gatehouse Way, Aylesbury, Bucks HP19 8XU
Telephone: 01296 318540

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APPOINTMENT OF JUDGES AT LIMITED, OPEN AND CHAMPIONSHIP SHOWS WITHOUT CCs FROM 2019 ONWARDS

Following a number of enquiries from judges and inviting societies, the Kennel Club would like to clarify the matter of the appointment of judges at limited and open shows and for non CC classes at championship shows as of 1st January 2019 when the Judges Competency Framework (JCF) begins.

At shows held on or after 1st January 2019, no person should be appointed who has never judged before, unless they have undertaken the new Kennel Club mandatory requirements. All aspiring judges must have completed the introductory education and training. Anyone hoping to judge for the first time in 2019, and those with some judging experience but not yet on a breed club B list, should now work towards meeting all of the Level 1 requirements, which can be found at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/media/1128987/jcf_guide_to_being_a_dog_show_judge.pdf.

Eligibility to judge will be as follows:

  • For up to 3 (5) classes of a breed at a general canine society/breed club limited or open show the judge should be at Level 1. 
  • For more than 3 (5) classes of a breed at a general canine society/breed club limited or open show the judge should be at least at Level 2 or on a club B list or above.
  • For any number of classes for non CC breeds at championship shows the judge should be at least at Level 2 or on a club B list or above.
  • For stakes and variety classes, groups and BIS at a general canine society limited or open show the judge should be at Level 4 (ie approved to award CCs) for at least one breed. Details of a CC judge’s experience can be found on the Find a Judge facility at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/judge/.

Now that the JCF criteria have been announced, show societies should be working towards selecting judges using the JCF criteria.  However, recognising that the Kennel Club Academy and Find a Judge programming is being designed with a ‘go live’ date no later than January 2019, show societies may continue to refer to club lists.  The further into the transition period we get, and as soon as the JCF goes live and the Find a Judge information is available on the Kennel Club website, the selection of judges must be under the JCF criteria.

It is strongly recommended that as part of each show society’s judging contract the judge is asked to confirm they will be registered as a member of the Kennel Club Academy at the time of the appointment and have received confirmation of their status under the JCF.  The transition document to assist judges in identifying their judging level is available at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/media/1128983/jcf_transition_table_from_judges_lists_to_jcf_levels.pdf.

Judges are strongly encouraged to register on the Kennel Club Academy, as many have already done so, in preparation for their account to be transferred across when the JCF goes live and then have their judging level(s) verified.  By so doing they will be the first to be featured on the revised Find a Judge facility and consequently available for show societies to select.

The Kennel Club Academy costs just £26 for one year's access to all of the Judges Education resources, including new resources which the Kennel Club will continue to add over the next 12 months. Please visit www.kcacademy.org.uk/shop/all-courses/judges-education-bundle/.

City of Birmingham Canine Association is kindly offering breed club officials and other interested parties the opportunity to ask questions about the JCF at its championship show at Stoneleigh Park, near Coventry, Warwickshire on the weekend of 2nd and 3rd September 2017.

The Vice Chairman of the Kennel Club Judges Committee, Jeff Horswell, will be on hand along with Kennel Club staff at the show where informal ‘drop in’ sessions will be held at noon and 2.30pm on both the Saturday and Sunday. The noon session is designed for breed club officials, while the 2.30pm one is aimed at a more general audience, although people are welcome to attend whichever time slot suits them best. The venue will be the Strollers restaurant, between halls 1 and 2, which will be well sign-posted within the halls of the show.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said “With under two years to go until the JCF begins, it is very important that societies know which levels apply to the judge they are inviting for shows being held from 1st January 2019 onwards.  Equally, it is important that judges understand their obligations so that they are not disadvantaged by not being featured on Find a Judge – and so that the transition period is as smooth as we all wish it to be.”

 

JUDGING AT PARTNERSHIP SHOWS

Due to the current increase in partnership shows being held, the Kennel Club would like to clarify its position with regard to judging at such events.

Partnership shows are those which are held where a host society and another club share a venue and facilities in order to allow exhibitors the opportunity to exhibit at two events during the duration of the host society’s show. In most cases, the host society’s event will be a general championship show held over a number of days.

At partnership shows, a judge should not officiate at one show and enter and exhibit at the other show even if they are exhibiting a different breed on another day to that which they are to judge.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The Kennel Club believes that it is important that the role of a judge is separate from that of an exhibitor. Anyone entering a dog for competition at a show should not have access to any of the facilities offered to judges and nor should they fraternise with judges. The partnership show concept is proving popular with societies and exhibitors alike, so it is important that exhibitors have confidence that judges are concentrating totally on the task for which they have been appointed.”

 

 

KENNEL CLUB INTRODUCES ONLINE FORM TO ADD KENNEL NAMES

The Kennel Club has now made it easier for owners wishing to add their Kennel Name to a dog’s existing pedigree papers by launching an online application form on the Kennel Club website.

The new online version of ‘Form 8’ means that Kennel Club customers now have two options when requesting to add a Kennel Name to a dog’s registered name; apply online or send an application form in the post. It is believed a lot of people will find the new application and payment system much quicker and more convenient.

All submissions will still be checked manually by the Kennel Club for errors or invalid words before approval. The person applying for an addition to a dog’s Kennel Name must be the registered owner before ‘Form 8’ can be submitted. Any new owners will need to complete the Change of Ownership process before they can apply to add a Kennel Name.

To add a Kennel Name to your dog’s registered name, please visit the Kennel Club website at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/forms/form-8-change-of-name-of-registered-dog-addition-of-kennel-name.

 

KENNEL CLUB ADDRESSES ISSUE OF UNRECOGNISED COLOUR REGISTRATIONS IN PEDIGREE DOGS

The Kennel Club and breed clubs are increasingly concerned about fashions in unrecognised colours and these colours being advertised as ‘rare’ and the Kennel Club is putting measures in place to tackle the issue while gathering data to help protect the welfare of all dogs.

The Kennel Club is wary of the dangers of breeding or buying dogs solely for colour, particularly when these colours are unrecognised in the breed and are often advertised as being ’rare’.  People breeding these dogs are often doing so with little or no regard for important elements such as health, temperament and conformation, and are effectively duping puppy buyers by claiming certain colours are ‘rare’ or advertising litters as colours that do not exist.

Having listened to the views of breed clubs and others involved in the dog world, the Kennel Club has announced the first phase of measures to address the problem, which will come into effect immediately.  These measures have come about as a direct result of recommendations made by the Kennel Club’s Communications Working Party and have involved a considerable financial investment in database development over the past year.

The measures include:

Kennel Club database change

When registering litters online via MyKC, breeders have previously been presented with a drop-down box which lists all recognised colours in their breed and a generic ‘Colour Not Recognised’ option.  This has been updated so that breeders must now manually enter the colour of the puppy if selecting the Colour Not Recognised (CNR) option. This is mandatory and the colour must be entered to proceed with the registration.  This will enable the Kennel Club to collect data on CNR registrations across all breeds, which will be used along with other information to decide what further action that needs to be taken, and will mean that the Kennel Club is the only organisation to hold data on colours in all registered dogs. Although the specific unrecognised colours will not be published, it is planned that the Kennel Club will work in conjunction with breed clubs in order to increase knowledge in this area.

Engaging with puppy buyers

After data on CNR registrations has been collected for a number of months, the Kennel Club plans to advise CNR puppy buyers, at the point when they transfer their puppy into their name, about the need to choose a mate of a recognised colour if planning to breed from their puppy in the future – if they fail to do this, they will run the risk that the Kennel Club may not register the progeny.

Education and online resources

To ensure that both puppy buyers and breeders of all levels of experience are made aware of the recognised colours across all breeds and the issues with unrecognised colours, new content has been added to the Kennel Club website for every single breed – on its Find a Puppy tool (www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/findapuppy/) and on the Breed Information Centre (www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/breed/). Special focus at this stage will be paid to four breeds that are known to have seen surges in unrecognised colours – Labradors, Pugs, French Bulldogs and Bulldogs - and it is planned to add other breeds to the list in due course.

A specific ‘What colour should my puppy be?’ web page has also been created with a link to various other areas of the Kennel Club website, to highlight what colours are recognised in each breed and the issues with unrecognised colours. This can be accessed at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/getting-a-dog-or-puppy/what-colour-should-my-puppy-be/. It is also planned to develop a web-based seminar on recognised colours, with a view to holding Kennel Club regional seminars on the same subject at a later date.

Kennel Club Puppy Naming Service

Some breeders choose to use the Kennel Club Puppy Naming Service when registering their litters. Traditionally, the Kennel Club has made its own kennel name available, e.g. Kensteen, when processing these litters for breeders without a kennel name. However, in another new measure, breeders without a kennel name will no longer have access to the Kennel Club’s own kennel name when registering litters containing CNR puppies.

Assured Breeder Scheme

Members of the Assured Breeder Scheme who choose to breed unrecognised colours will be required from now on to carry out all health tests in their chosen breed, whether required or recommended, and this information will be checked for compliance at the time of joining the scheme as well as during any subsequent visit from a Regional Breeder Assessor.

Penny Rankine-Parsons, Breed Health Coordinator for French Bulldogs, said: “We should all be encouraged by this first stage, which the Kennel Club has put in place to address the very complicated problem of unrecognised colours across all breeds. This issue affects my breed more than any other and, although these may be viewed by some as small steps, they are certainly positive ones and in the right direction.

“The fact that the Kennel Club  will now be able to record  exactly what colours the CNR registrations are will enable them to monitor and analyse the statistics and ensure that the next stage and future decisions will be based on facts. The various changes to the Kennel Club website are also important in the education of the public about correct breed standard colours and, as these changes are quite prominent with links to various pages such as the Find a Puppy section, they should prove to be an excellent learning resource for those looking for a puppy."

Vicky Collins-Nattrass, Breed Health Coordinator for Bulldogs, said: “We have had serious concerns with regards to unrecognised colours, and thus, we welcome the Kennel Club’s aim of dealing with this issue and look forward to the progression of this project.”

Lynda Heron, Joint Breed Health Coordinator for Labrador Retrievers, said: “As the Labrador is the most popular breed of dog in the UK, we are glad to see that the Kennel Club is taking steps to address the problem of unrecognised colours in this breed and across the board.  We hope it will serve as a clear warning and help to educate puppy seekers and less experienced breeders or those deliberately breeding unrecognised colours.”

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The Kennel Club is taking this action in relation to unrecognised colours, following concerns expressed by serious breed enthusiasts as well as breed clubs. These measures will send a clear message to anyone thinking of breeding a litter or buying a puppy that it is best to avoid doing so based upon one factor only – in this case, colour. There is a lot of really useful information for puppy seekers on the Kennel Club website and we are confident that these latest changes will improve the chances of people making more informed choices when it comes to buying a puppy in a responsible manner.

“With breeders specifying exactly which unrecognised colours they are registering from now on, the Kennel Club will be better placed to analyse the data in order to look at the possibility of a second phase of measures based upon science as well as other factors.”

Where there is evidence that certain colours can affect the health of dogs, the Kennel Club may restrict registrations, as it has done for any puppies, for any breed, that are produced as a result of mating two merle (dapple) coloured parents together.

Any breed clubs which have experienced issues with unrecognised colours are invited to submit their ideas for possible further measures to the Kennel Club. Please email CNR@thekennelclub.org.uk, ensuring the subject line of ‘Unrecognised colours’ is included.  Only genuine suggestions from breed clubs for tackling the issue of unrecognised colours should be directed to this email address.  

 

KENNEL CLUB WORKING WITH FINNISH KENNEL CLUB TO CREATE ADVANCED JUDGING COURSE


The Kennel Club has joined forces with the Finnish Kennel Club to create an advanced judging course, both governing bodies have announced.
The course, entitled ‘Eye for a Dog’, is well established in Finland and due to be incorporated into the Kennel Club’s recently-announced Judges Competency Framework (JCF) which begins in 2019.


All judges in the UK seeking approval through the JCF for their first breed or a further breed (Level 4) will be required to have passed the ‘Eye for a Dog’ exam as a one-time requirement.


The course will ensure judges have a greater understanding of conformation and movement, be able to describe how a dog is constructed and how it moves. Candidates will also be required to identify various dog breeds.


Part of the course will involve pre-learning on the Kennel Club Academy, the Kennel Club’s online education resource, and existing CC judges wishing to add further breeds will be able to opt to do as much or little of the course as they wish prior to taking the exam.


Simon Luxmoore, Kennel Club Chairman, said: “We are delighted to be working with the Finnish Kennel Club in developing the ‘Eye for a Dog’ course under the JCF. The Finns have a reputation for educating their judges in a very comprehensive and effective way, so we are confident that this collaboration will offer British judges meaningful canine education and exhibitors will know that new judges have demonstrated their knowledge of canine construction.”


Harri Lehkonen, Finnish Kennel Club Chairman, said: “It is our pleasure to be working with the Kennel Club on this project. It can only help to produce better judges, which surely is the aim of all kennel clubs worldwide. We are very happy to be able to assist the development of the newly-announced JCF in this way.”

The Judges Education section of the Kennel Club Academy supports resources including the recently-added conformation and movement films, the points of the dog drag and drop exercise, and films on the ’Requirements of a Dog Show Judge’, ‘Ring Stewarding’ and breed health monitoring forms. More resources will be added in the coming weeks. For further details, please visit www.kcacademy.org.uk.

 

AMENDMENTS TO DEFINITION OF MID LIMIT AND LIMIT CLASSES

The Kennel Club has agreed amendments to the definition of the Mid Limit and Limit classes at breed shows, with effect from 1st January 2018.

The amendments are as follows:

Mid Limit – For dogs which have not become show Champions under Kennel Club Regulations or under the rules of any governing body recognised by the KC, or won 3 or more CC/CACIB/CAC/Green Stars or won 5 or more First Prizes in all at Championship Shows in Mid Limit, Limit and Open classes, confined to the breed, whether restricted or not, at Shows where CCs were offered for the breed.

[Amendment underlined.]

Limit – For dogs which have not become show Champions under Kennel Club Regulations or under the rules of any governing body recognised by the Kennel Club, or won 3 or more CC/CACIB/CAC/Green Stars or won 7 or more First Prizes in all at Championship Shows in Limit and Open Classes, confined to the breed, whether restricted or not, at Shows where Challenge Certificates were offered for the breed.

[Amendment underlined.]

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The SEC has noted that exhibits can have won three or more CCs, CACs, CACIBs or Green Stars without having qualified for a Champion title, whether they are resident in the UK or abroad. Therefore they were still able to qualify for Mid Limit and Limit classes giving them an unfair advantage over exhibitors whose dogs have been made Champions with the same number of awards. It is for this reason that these amendments have been brought in, to make these classes fairer for exhibitors.”

These amended class definitions will be reviewed by the SEC after they have been in operation for a period of 12 months.

 

KENNEL CLUB CONSULTS EXHIBITORS AND SHOW SOCIETIES ON PROPOSED CHANGES TO SHOW REGULATIONS

The Kennel Club has issued a consultation document on its website in relation to proposed changes to show regulations to allow dogs to be entered in variety classes without having to enter a breed class, and to allow beaten dogs declared best of breed to compete in group and best in show competitions.

Following a review of all comments received over many months on the above topics, amendments to Kennel Club regulations are now proposed for consideration. To summarise, the proposed amendments to the F regulations give effect to the current suspension of regulations to allow:

  • Dogs to be entered into variety classes without having been entered or competing in a breed class.
  • Dogs declared Best of Breed or Best Any Variety Not Separately Classified and beaten in variety classes, to continue to challenge for Best Puppy in Group and Best Puppy in Show and Best in Group and Best in Show respectively.

It is also proposed that the eligibility for Best Puppy in Show at open shows be changed to reflect that of championship shows i.e. only puppies eligible to challenge are those declared Best Puppy in Breed or Best AVNSC Puppy.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The Kennel Club has been most grateful to those exhibitors and show societies which have already given feedback on the relaxation of show regulations in relation to stakes classes and also ‘beaten’ dogs. This information has proven invaluable to the working party and we are now ready to look at the changes to the regulations which will need to be made when the period of relaxation is over. This is everyone’s chance to have their say, so we are hoping for a good response.”

The Dog Show Promotion Working Party has issued the document for consultation at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/media/1116015/f_regulation_changes.pdf and any comments should be emailed to KCNotifications@thekennelclub.org.uk with the subject line ‘Show Regulation changes’. Please be sure to include reference to the relevant paragraph number and respond no later than 28th April 2017. These comments will then be referred to the working party for its consideration. The intention is for the new regulations to be effective for shows held on or after 1st January 2018.

 

BVA/KC CANINE HEALTH SCHEMES PRICING FOR 2017

As of 1st January 2017, the fees for some of the British Veterinary Association/Kennel Club Canine Health Schemes will increase, to reflect unavoidable cost increases.

The new pricings are as follows:

BVA/KC HIP AND ELBOW DYSPLASIA SCHEMES

Number of dogs

Charge per dog

(inc VAT)

1

£52.50  

(£63.00)

5 or more dogs (same owner)

£46.00

(£55.25)

Re-scoring/re-grading under appeal

£95.00                 

(£114.00)

Duplicate copy of certificate

£30.00         

(£36.00)

Joint hip & elbow

£95.00       

(£114.00)

BVA/KC/ISDS EYE SCHEME

Number of dogs

Charge per dog

(inc VAT) Incl cert

Routine eye examination:

 

 

1 dog

£46.70

(£56.00)

Extra dogs in same ownership

£41.25 

(£49.50)

Group testing (25 or more)

£32.50    

(£39.00)

Examination of dogs over 8 years of age

£27.50  

(£33.00)

Gonioscopy:

£46.70

£56.00

Gonioscopy performed at the same time as a routine examination

£41.25

(£49.50)

 

Litter screening:

 

 

Per litter of 1-3 puppies

£28.33

(£34.00)

Per puppy thereafter for litters with more than 3 puppies

£9.17

(£11.00)

Duplicate copy of certificate

£30.00

(£36.00)

Please note – breeders are hereby given advance notice that puppies presented for litter screening under the Eye Scheme as of 1st July 2017 must have been microchipped prior to examination.

BVA/KC CHIARI-LIKE MALFORMATION/SYRINGOMYELIA (CM/SM) SCHEME

The fees for this scheme remain unchanged from 2016:

Number of dogs

Charge per dog

(inc VAT)

1

£83.33

(£100.00)

Re-assessment under the appeals procedure

£83.33

(£100.00)

Procedure notes and advice on the BVA/KC Canine Health Schemes, along with information leaflets for owners, can be obtained, free of charge, from Canine Health Schemes, BVA, 7 Mansfield Street, London W1G 9NQ, telephone 020 7908 6380, fax 020 7908 6389.

For further information on the BVA/KC Canine Health Schemes, visit www.bva.co.uk/chs.

 

KENNEL CLUB INTRODUCES ONLINE REGISTRATION FOR IMPORTED DOGS

The Kennel Club has made it easier for owners wishing to register an imported dog, by launching an online application form on the Kennel Club website.

In order to show or compete with an imported dog in any discipline in the UK, the dog must be registered with the Kennel Club. It must also be registered before any progeny bred from it can be registered in the UK.

The new online form means that Kennel Club customers now have two options to register an imported dog, as they may still apply by post if they are unable to do so online.
 

In order to be eligible for registration, the imported dog would need to be registered with an appropriate overseas kennel club and in the ownership of the applicant, who must reside either within the UK, Republic of Ireland or Channel Islands.

The Kennel Club will normally accept registration for dogs from overseas countries only when the following applies:

  • The breed is recognised by the Kennel Club.
  • The Kennel Club has a reciprocal agreement with the overseas kennel club which has full membership, associate membership or contract partnership of the FCI (Federation Cynologique Internationale).
  • The owner and the dog are both resident at an address in the UK, Republic of Ireland or Channel Islands.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “By offering the means to register an imported dog online, we are streamlining the process and making things quicker and more convenient for owners.

“Those who are unable to apply online for whatever reason can still apply by post, but we are hoping that the new service will prove popular and far more suitable for owners, who are leading increasingly busy lives.”

In order to register an imported dog online, please visit the Kennel Club website at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/registration and follow the link to ‘overseas registration’.

 

KENNEL CLUB RELAXES MORE REGULATIONS FOR THE BENEFIT OF SHOWS AND EXHIBITORS

Kennel Club show regulations are to be relaxed to allow those judges not on the B list to judge up to four classes of a breed at open shows, with the proviso that one of these classes is a puppy class, and the corresponding increase of up to six classes for Stud Book band E breeds. This also applies to non-CC breeds at general championship shows and will come into effect on 1st January 2017.

The changes were announced by Keith Young, in his report on the work of the Dog Show Promotion Working Party, at a Special General Meeting of the Kennel Club held last week. The proposal was supported by both the Show Executive Committee and the Judges Committee, and its principle was also supported by the Kennel Club Shows Liaison Council.

Mr Young said: “The working party believes these changes will encourage open shows to schedule puppy classes and give exhibitors with new puppies the option to start at local open shows. 

“This will also provide open shows with an opportunity to tailor their classifications to target both new puppies and new exhibitors while at the same time increasing entries and offering exhibitors more opportunities to show their puppies.”

Open show organisers are reminded that they can disregard puppy classes when calculating class averages should the entry be detrimental to the overall average.

Show societies which have already printed their schedules for 2017 will not be allowed to reprint them in order to schedule extra puppy classes, which the Kennel Club acknowledges will cause disappointment in some cases. However, societies in a position to increase the number of classes are required to notify the Kennel Club but do not need to apply for a revised licence. For further details please email cat@thekennelclub.org.uk

The relevant changes to the show regulations will be published in the next available issue of the Kennel Club Journal.

 

DOUBLE HANDLING PROHIBITED IN ALL BREEDS, KENNEL CLUB REMINDS EXHIBITORS

Following recent incidents at shows, the Kennel Club wishes to remind exhibitors in all breeds that double handling is prohibited.

Double handling involves attracting an exhibit from outside the ring and can take many forms – everything from using toys and food to attract attention to calling out a dog’s name. The vast majority of exhibitors do not get involved in such behaviour, as it is not only prohibited by the Show Regulations but importantly is unsporting and can give the dog an unfair advantage over its fellow competitors. 

The relevant regulation reads as follows:

F(1)17.h

The attracting of the attention of exhibits by any method from outside the ring is prohibited. It is the duty of the Judge, steward or Show Management noticing such attraction to ask that it cease.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “There is a perception among some exhibitors that double handling is an issue which affects only the German Shepherd Dog breed. This is not true – the regulation applies to all breeds and, where breaches are reported to the Kennel Club with evidence, appropriate action will be taken.”

 

 

For all Breed Clubs holding puppy walk classes - Official notification from the Kennel Club

'We can confirm that a Puppy walk should simply be a walk with no form of competition involved.

It is acceptable to stage these at a show as this may assist with socialisation and some early experience in the ring.

However, it is not acceptable to schedule any competitive classes for dogs under six calendar months of age.

This includes undergoing a hands-on examination or an overall winner being selected,

even if the puppies are not placed in order of preference at the end of the parade.'

 

September 2016

KENNEL CLUB EXTENDS SUSPENSION OF AV STAKES CLASSES AND UNBEATEN DOG REGULATIONS

The Kennel Club has extended by a year the suspension to the regulations which stipulate that dogs must be entered and exhibited in a breed class before exhibiting in an Any Variety Class/Stakes Class, and the regulation that only unbeaten dogs are eligible to compete in a group or best in show competition.

These regulations were first suspended at the beginning of 2015, and during this time the Dog Show Promotion Working Party has analysed the effect of this decision on the dog show scene.

It was anticipated that this decision would not only encourage exhibitors who had dogs entered in both AV/Stakes classes and breed classes to compete in all classes for which they had originally entered, thus reducing the absentee rate for AV classes, but that additional entries would be generated from exhibitors who may not have wished or been eligible to enter their dogs in the scheduled breed classes for any reason.  The other benefit is that dogs declared best of breed need not withdraw from AV classes to remain unbeaten for the group competition.

Keith Young, Dog Show Promotion Working Party Chairman, said: "We believe that these changes have had a positive impact on entries especially at championship shows, and have made for better competition in AV/Stakes classes. However, the Kennel Club still has much work to do and we will be using this extra 12 months of the suspension to revise the regulations to formalise the suspension for championship shows and continue with our consultation on the open show scene.  The new championship show regulations will be published in draft format for comment in the coming months.”

The Kennel Club has published FAQs to assist show societies and exhibitors with the implications of this policy at https://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/activities/dog-showing/already-involved-in-dog-showing/exhibitors/avstakes-classes-beaten-dog-rule-suspension-faqs/.

Anyone requiring further information should contact breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk

 


July 2016

The Kennel Club would like to remind clubs and societies of the importance of the proper reporting of any incidents occurring at shows, using the incident book. Clear reports, containing all relevant details, allow incidents to be investigated more easily and as a result any issues may be resolved more quickly, which is beneficial to all concerned.

 

The Kennel Club website has been updated to explain the responsibilities of the show management when it comes to reporting incidents, as well as offering advice on how to fill out the incident book correctly. Competitors are reminded that they should report an incident occurring at a show, and detailed guidance on how to do so is provided on the website.

Please visit www.thekennelclub.org.uk/activities/incidents-at-shows/

Any incidents of unsatisfactory judging procedure may be reported via the incident book at a show. The Kennel Club will note any such reports, and will investigate should consistent reports be received regarding any one judge.

 

News - July 2016 - COLLIES AND DACHSHUNDS BORN WITH RECESSIVE COAT TYPE NOW ELIGIBLE TO BE REGISTERED IN CORRESPONDING BREED

Collies and Dachshunds born in litters of a different coat type to that of their parents, due to recessive genes, are now eligible to be entered in the register of the breed to which their coat most closely conforms, the Kennel Club has announced. Annex D to Regulation B2 has been amended - When Collies (Smooth) are mated any dog in the resulting litter shall be eligible for entry in the register of the breed to which its coat most closely conforms. Therefore, progeny may also be registered as Collies (Rough).

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “It makes sense that Collies and Dachshunds born with a different coat type to that of their parents should be eligible to be entered in the register of the breed to which their coat most closely conforms, especially as a precedent already exists with the Belgian Shepherd Dog and Chihuahua breeds. However, we would point out that the Kennel Club reserves the right to DNA profile any litters where parentage may be in question. Also, in the case of Dachshunds, we would emphasise that this latest amendment to the regulations is about coat type only and does not allow for the interchange of Dachshunds between the two sizes.”

KC Withdraw Dachshund statement

 

CHAMPIONSHIP SHOW JUDGES MUST LEAD BY EXAMPLE: KENNEL CLUB ISSUES STATEMENT

The Kennel Club is becoming increasingly concerned at the number of incidents of disparaging, threatening and abusive behaviour involving championship show judges which have taken place at shows recently, where a judge was involved either as an exhibitor, judge or spectator.

All participants at dog shows, including judges, are reminded of the Kennel Club’s policies regarding harassment and abusive behaviour. Whilst the Kennel Club understands that there are pressures and tensions which arise at a competitive level, no individual should be subject to intimidation or made to feel alarmed, distressed or put in fear of reprisal.

Kennel Club Show Regulations F10 and F3 state that those taking part in Kennel Club licensed/approved events are expected to maintain and abide by the highest standards in accordance with the Kennel Club’s rules and regulations and codes of conduct.

Judges are reminded that the Kennel Club has the power to investigate any breach of these show regulations. If any judge is deemed to have engaged in harassment and abusive behaviour, the Judges Sub-Committee has the power to impose a fine and decline approval for any judging appointments for a period it considers necessary.

Furthermore, any act of violence or threatening behaviour conducted at a show could constitute a criminal offence. In this situation, the Kennel Club will co-operate fully with the police and defer any action pending the outcome of such investigation and/or prosecution.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “Kennel Club championship show judges enjoy a privileged position within the world of dogs, so it is absolutely vital that they lead by example and set the very highest standards of conduct, whether they are in attendance at a show as a judge or in some other capacity.

“Sadly, there have been some cases recently where the behaviour of judges has been far from desirable. In such instances, fines of up to £300 have been imposed and judging appointments declined for a period of up to five years, such is the gravity with which the Kennel Club views such unacceptable behaviour.”

 

June 2016

HANDLING OF DOGS AT SHOWS

The Kennel Club wishes to remind exhibitors of its policies regarding the handling of dogs whilst in the show ring, particularly in relation to the moving of dogs around the ring.

The Kennel Club is aware that some breeds are shown with a tighter lead as a matter of constraint or to emphasise the outline of the dog’s neck, which does not cause the dog distress. However, there have been instances where dogs have been moved around the ring in a manner which could potentially cause distress to the dog.

Exhibitors are therefore reminded that it is not acceptable to handle a dog in a manner which causes its feet not to touch the ground when on the move. Exhibitors should note that such practices could constitute harsh handling and reports of such practice will be referred to the committee under Kennel Club Show Regulation F11.

The same applies to the practice of picking up dogs, often terriers, by their necks and/or tails when lifting them to and from the table during judging. Such practice is both undesirable and unnecessary.

If a judge feels that a dog is being handled in an unacceptable manner which may cause discomfort to the dog, they should remind the exhibitor that this practice is not allowed and ask that it cease.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “Exhibitors, judges and show officials all have a duty of care to the dogs present at the show and it is therefore important that they ensure the welfare of the dogs both whilst in the ring, and during the day within the precincts of the show.”

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To raise awareness of the work carried out by the Kennel Club, a new report has been produced on ‘What the Kennel Club does for dog health’. 

How to access it

A PDF of the report is available under the health section of the Kennel Club website, or it can be accessed directly via www.thekennelclub.org.uk/kchealth

Who is it for?

Anyone!  Please feel free to share our new document with any of your friends and colleagues in your breed, if you feel it appropriate.

What does it contain?

The report encompasses much of the work undertaken in recent years and includes detailed sections on:

·         How we promote health through education

·         Initiatives designed to improve health awareness in dog shows

·         How we promote and progress scientific research

·         How we encourage responsible breeding of healthy dogs.

 

Each topic covered in the report is accompanied by an impact statistic to show what effect each initiative, or event, has had.

 

 

 

May 2016

B LIST EXEMPTIONS: INVITING SOCIETIES REMINDED OF BIS AND POLICY JUDGES AND JDP CREDIT JUDGES

The Kennel Club wishes to remind inviting societies of the existence of its previously published ‘Best in Show and Policy judge statement’. The statement confirms that these judges are exempt from the requirement to be on a breed club B list or higher for breeds in their approved group(s) for which they have not yet been approved to award CCs in order to be eligible to judge more than 3 classes (or 5 for Stud Book band E breeds) at Open Shows or to judge non CC breeds at General and Group Championship Shows.

A Policy judge is an individual who has previously been approved to award Challenge Certificates to 70% of the breeds in any particular group.

Similarly, Judges Development Programme candidates who have passed a breed assessment and achieved a breed credit are also exempt from the need to be on a B list or higher at such events when judging said breed.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “Regulation F(1)21.b outlines the eligibility of those who may judge breeds at open shows or non CC breeds at General and Group Championship Shows. However, sitting outside these regulations are a number of other judges who, due to KC policy, are also eligible to judge at these shows. We therefore thought it best to clarify this matter for those societies looking to invite judges.”

 

BAITING EXHIBITS AT SHOWS

Following a number of queries received, relating to baiting exhibits in the ring at Kennel Club licensed events, the Kennel Club wishes to clarify its position.

Baiting is the use of food or other items in the ring by handlers to encourage and keep the interest of their exhibits. Whilst this activity does not contravene Kennel Club Regulations, it should be carried out only in a discreet manner and not result in distracting or disturbing another exhibit.

The Kennel Club has received a number of complaints that excessive amounts of food are being left on the floor in show rings which has, in some cases, ultimately affected the performance of other exhibits.

The Kennel Club hopes that all participants at licensed shows will refrain from dropping food on the floor in the ring.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “We ask that all exhibitors please take great care in the use of food, or any other item that may cause distraction, in the ring and make every effort to ensure that food is not dropped to avoid potentially distracting other exhibits, in the interests of fairness.”

*****

INELIGIBLE JUDGES AND AMENDMENTS TO SHOW SCHEDULES

The Kennel Club wishes to clarify the procedure and options available to a society if a judge is ineligible to judge the number of classes scheduled for a breed.

Regulation F(1)21.b.(1) states that ‘For non Challenge Certificate breeds at Championship Shows and for General Canine Society Open Shows, Affiliated Organisations Open shows and Breed Club Open Shows scheduling more than three breed classes for a particular breed (five classes for Stud Book Band E breeds), the selected Judge must, when appointed by the Club/Society, either:

(a)Have previously been approved to award Challenge Certificates to the relevant breed and have not been declared ineligible to do so by the time of carrying out the appointment or

(b)Be included on a Breed Council/Club B judges list or above. In the latter case before accepting such an appointment, the selected Judge must ensure that their name is included on a relevant Breed Council/Club judges list.’

Exceptions to these requirements are judges resident in Northern Ireland for those shows held in the province, and overseas judges who are approved to judge the breed concerned at Championship level in the country in which they are domiciled.

A judge must be eligible to judge the breed at the time of signing the contract and, by signing, the judge confirms that they are eligible to judge the breed.  However, should it subsequently become apparent that the judge is ineligible to judge the number of classes that they have been contracted for, this would result in them being unable to carry out their appointment. In this situation, the society has two options:

If the schedule has not been printed, then it is acceptable for the society to amend the classification as required, to ensure the judge is eligible to judge the number of classes scheduled. The society would need to issue the judge with a new judging contract for the appropriate number of classes.

If the schedule has been printed, it is suggested that the society allows the judge to withdraw from the contract so that it may find a suitably qualified judge. It is not possible to amend the schedule once it has been printed and if an ineligible judge then judges the scheduled classes, the matter may be referred to Committee for consideration and could result in sanctions being imposed on both the club and judge.

Regulation F(1)8.d. states that no modifications may be made to the schedule except by permission of the General Committee of the Kennel Club and which must be followed by advertisement in the canine press. Therefore, it is not possible for societies to remove classes once the schedule has been printed.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “It is the joint responsibility of judges and show societies to ensure that judges are eligible for the number of classes scheduled.  

“We are aware that some societies have removed classes in order to ensure that the judge does not have to withdraw from the contract, while in other cases societies have had to replace the judge.  Neither of these scenarios is in the best interests of exhibitors, so we would strongly urge show societies and judges to ensure the details are correct at the time the judging contract is signed.”

 

March 2016

KENNEL CLUB LAUNCHES ONLINE LEARNING WEBSITE FOR BREEDERS, JUDGES AND KCAI SCHEME MEMBERS AT CRUFTS

The Kennel Club is pleased to announce the launch of its new online learning resource, the Kennel Club Academy, home to accessible education to support those involved in the world of dogs.

Led by the Kennel Club’s Training Board, the Academy is an online learning resource for breeders, judges and KCAI scheme members. It aims to provide consistent and high quality standards of education and training in every area of Kennel Club activity.

A range of learning resources, films and assessments are available through the Academy, sharing insight and guidance from professionals and experts in their fields. The Academy will be showcased to the public on the Kennel Club stand at Crufts from 10th – 13th March at the NEC Birmingham.

Everyone interested in expanding their knowledge will be able to learn at their own pace, as all the Academy resources are available 24/7 and can be accessed as many times as the user wishes.

The information provided in the Judges Education area aims to encourage aspiring and established judges to attend seminars and assessments delivered by Kennel Club Accredited Trainers.  These seminars explain the importance of the role of the dog show judge and provide information on Kennel Club regulations and judging procedures, making it easier for new and current judges to keep up to date.

The breed specific films featured on the Academy website are a learning resource for judges and others with an interest in the featured breeds.  The Training Board is keen to develop this area into an online library of films with multiple films for a breed. Breed Clubs are therefore invited to give serious consideration to developing their own breed specific film. The Kennel Club’s Educational Trust has agreed to contribute funds to help those clubs and councils that wish to take a proactive approach to their judge’s education and develop their own breed specific film to be featured on the Academy.  The Training Board’s view is that the more information which can be made available about a particular breed the better to provide a rounded education for a breed.

Dog breeders will also benefit from the launch of the Kennel Club Academy.  The Academy features a variety of films aimed at those who are considering breeding from their dog including all the knowledge needed to support their dog’s health and welfare.

The Chairman of the Kennel Club Dog Health Group, Nick Blayney said: “The Kennel Club Academy is the single most useful resource available to dog breeders, new and old, to enable them to understand how to breed healthy dogs. It is a great achievement and one that I am proud to have been involved with. I hope that anybody interested in dog breeding, whether as breeders or as potential owners or who just wants to understand the principles, will turn to the Kennel Club Academy.

“Experienced and long standing dog breeders now have the opportunity to update their knowledge of the rapidly developing science of dog breeding. The Kennel Club has developed an impressive reference centre which puts it at the forefront on matters of dog breeding and the Academy is the public face.”

All the presentations and films have been developed by experts in their fields and offer users an insight into their knowledge and experience.

With the launch of the Academy, KCAI scheme members will benefit from a new accessible online assessment process.  This resource aims to help KCAI members work towards their accreditation in a more structured and convenient way.  It provides a flexible and simple way to demonstrate knowledge prior to their practical assessment.  This new process also reduces the need for much of the paper-based Accreditation application.

Gerald King, Chairman of the Kennel Club Training Board said: "This is an exciting development that will be a valuable learning platform going forward. It will work in conjunction with the current seminars, providing pre-course learning for people interested in judging, breeding and the KCAI scheme. We want to thank everyone involved from our experts and board members who have been invaluable to this process.”

Users of the Kennel Club Academy will be able to see their own ‘record of learning’, providing a record of assessments and learning resources completed as well as space to host information on seminars attended plus calendars, glossaries of canine terminology and news.

The Training Board is keen to develop additional partners who might wish to contribute to the Academy.  Interested parties can contact the Kennel Club Training Board with their proposal.

The breeder information will be free of charge, whilst the cost for judges education is £26 a year, with access to all courses. The costs for KCAI scheme members will be £5 per assessment.

The Academy Shop is where you’ll find information on what’s available. Once you set up your subscription and have received your login, you can start to browse the wealth of information available.

Breed clubs are encouraged to contact the Kennel Club Educational Trust which is offering to part fund breed specific films for the Academy. If your breed club or council is interested in making a breed specific film, please email KCET@thekennelclub.org.uk to request an information pack on how to apply and what is involved in developing a film.   

For any press wanting to organise an Academy demonstration during Crufts, please contact the press office press.office@thekennelclub.org.uk or visit the Toute Suite at the NEC Birmingham during the show.


August 2015

CHANGE TO LENGTH OF TIME BETWEEN CC APPOINTMENTS TO THE SAME SEX, SAME BREED

The Kennel Club General Committee has announced a change to the regulations concerning the length of time between CC appointments.

With effect for all nominations received at the Kennel Club on or after 1st January 2018, the minimum period of time between Challenge Certificate appointments to the same sex of the same breed, will increase from 12 to 18 months.

As a result of this announcement, all breed clubs, in particular those of numerically small breeds, will need to ensure that their judges lists are adequate to support the additional length of time between appointments.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary said ‘The Kennel Club believes that the change to the regulation will allow a greater rotation of judges and create increased opportunities for judges to be appointed for their desired breed or breeds.

“In order to ensure that there is a sufficient pool of judges to facilitate this change, breed clubs must, as a matter of priority, review their judges lists and consider how best to educate, promote and train judges to progress through their lists.

“We would take this opportunity to remind breed clubs of the importance of updating and circulating their judges lists. In particular, it would be helpful if clubs could ensure that up-to-date judges lists are available on their websites.”

For further advice on publishing judges lists online, please contact breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk.

All show societies will need to review the wording of their judges’ contracts and update as appropriate, and should note that any nominations they intend to submit to the Kennel Club on or after 1st January 2018 must comply with the 18 month time period.

 

April 2015

KENNEL CLUB CONCERNS OVER NON-PUBLICATION OF JUDGES’ CRITIQUES

The Kennel Club would like to remind all judges at Championship and Open Breed Club shows that they must produce a written critique for the first two placings in each class and send these to at least one of the weekly dog newspapers.

The Kennel Club has had to write to over 170 judges in a 12 month period concerning the non-publication of judges’ critiques.

The Kennel Club is concerned with the increasing amount of communication received from breed clubs, councils and individuals relating to the non-publication of critiques, and wants to ensure that judges follow regulations by submitting their critiques to Dog World and/or Our Dogs accordingly.

Kennel Club Regulation F(1)22.d. states that ‘All Judges at Championship Shows and Open Breed Club Shows must produce a written critique for the first two placings in each class, and will dispatch these to at least one of the weekly United Kingdom Canine journals.’

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The vast majority of judges are submitting critiques properly in accordance with the regulations, but unfortunately there are a small number that are not.

“The Kennel Club had to write to 174 judges over missing critiques last year and 17 of these still failed to produce one, which resulted in a number of fines being issued. Not submitting critiques properly can also lead to no further nominations to award CCs being considered by the Kennel Club General Committee until the matter is resolved, so it is in the best interests of judges to ensure they follow the regulations, which of course most of them do.

“We have been made aware of instances of judges submitting critiques to other outlets, such as Facebook pages, assuming that this complies with Kennel Club Regulations, so we would encourage all judges to familiarise themselves with the correct procedure as detailed in Kennel Club show regulations.”

Judges are reminded that producing a critique is an important part of the judging process, allowing the judge to outline the relative virtues and weaknesses of the dogs and to explain their placings.

The Kennel Club recommends that judges retain a copy of their critiques for a period of a year or until they see their report published.

To report a missing critique, please contact the Breed Shows Team at the Kennel Club, 1-5 Clarges Street, Piccadilly, London, W1J 8AB which will investigate further. Alternatively, emails may be sent to breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk.

April 2015

OVERSEAS WINS AND CALCULATING ELIGIBILITY FOR CLASSES AT KENNEL CLUB LICENSED SHOWS

The Kennel Club would like to remind dog show exhibitors that overseas wins must be taken into account when calculating eligibility for certain classes at Kennel Club licensed shows.

In the class definitions, a Challenge Certificate (CC) includes any show award that counts towards the title of Champion under the rules of any governing body recognised by the Kennel Club. For instance, a Green Star, CAC and/or CACIB is the equivalent of winning a CC. On this basis, a dog which has been awarded a CAC for example would not be eligible to compete in the Post Graduate class. The reference to ‘First Prizes’ in the definition of classes refers only to those First Prizes gained at shows in the UK.

If an exhibit is a Champion, it will generally only be eligible to enter the Open class with the exception of a ‘Special’ or age restricted class e.g. Yearling where eligibility is based solely on age and not on awards.

The Kennel Club does not recognise the title of Junior Champion. Therefore, if a dog has been awarded a Junior Champion title, this does not stop this dog from competing in the Limit class. However, a dog which has been awarded an overseas Champion title recognised by the Kennel Club would not be eligible for the Limit class. Exhibitors should take into account any award which counts towards the title of Champion (e.g. CACs, CACIBs, Green Stars).

Exhibitors are further reminded that when working out their dog’s eligibility for classes, all wins up to and including the seventh day before the date of closing of entries shall be counted when entering for any class. The specific date is always published in the show schedule and is calculated based on the paper entry closing date not the online closing date. This is particularly relevant to General and Group Championship shows.

Further information can be obtained from the Kennel Club website at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/media/494542/show_exhibitors_faqs.pdf.

 

November 2014

KENNEL CLUB ANNOUNCES TWO YEAR SUSPENSION OF AV STAKES CLASSES & UNBEATEN DOG REGULATIONS

The Kennel Club has announced a two year suspension to the regulations which stipulate that dogs must be entered and exhibited in a breed class before exhibiting in an Any Variety Class/Stakes Class, and the regulation that only unbeaten dogs are eligible to compete in a group or best in show competition.

The decision is the second policy change to result from the work of the Kennel Club’s Dog Show Promotion Working Party, which is looking into ways to improve and increase the popularity of dog shows.

As of 1 January 2015, there will be a two year suspension to the regulations which stipulate that dogs must be entered and exhibited in a breed class before exhibiting in an Any Variety Class/Stakes Class. It has been noted by the Kennel Club that exhibitors often withdraw their Best of Breeds from AV/Stakes classes in order to remain unbeaten for the group. Therefore, whilst many exhibitors initially enter the AV/Stakes Classes, not all go on to compete. 

It is anticipated that this regulation suspension will not only encourage exhibitors who have dogs entered in both AV/Stakes classes and breed classes to compete in all classes for which they had originally entered, thus reducing the absentee rate for AV classes, but that additional entries will be generated from exhibitors who may not wish or be eligible to enter their dogs in the scheduled breed classes for one reason or another.

The regulation that stipulates that only unbeaten dogs are eligible to compete in a group or best in show competition has also been suspended for a two year period.  Therefore a dog declared Best of Breed which has been beaten in an AV/Stakes class will remain eligible to compete in the group and best in show competitions.

Keith Young, Dog Show Promotion Working Party Chairman, said: “We believe that these proposals will have a positive impact on entries at shows, and will make for better competition in AV/Stakes classes.”

The Kennel Club will shortly publish FAQs to assist show societies and exhibitors with the implications of this new policy. In addition to this, updated specimen schedules will be available on the Kennel Club website to reflect the changes.

The announcement follows a previous change recommended by the Dog Show Promotion Working Party, which permits breed clubs to hold their Championship Shows in conjunction with another breed club, or with a larger General or Group Championship show. Effective from 1 January 2015, this policy will allow two sets of Challenge Certificates in the same breed to be awarded at two different Championship shows on the same day, at the same venue.

Anyone requiring further information about the changes should contact breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk.

 

PETLOG AND KENNEL CLUB HIGHLIGHT BREEDERS’ RESPONSIBILITIES FOLLOWING NEW MICROCHIP REGULATIONS

The Microchipping of Dogs Regulations 2014 were announced on Wednesday 28th October, and Petlog and the Kennel Club have highlighted the responsibilities of breeders and dog owners once microchipping becomes compulsory in England from 6 April 2016.

The Kennel Club, the UK’s largest dog welfare organisation, has campaigned for compulsory microchipping as part of the Microchipping Alliance alongside Petlog, the UK’s largest lost and found database for microchipped pets.

To clarify the regulations regarding breeders: a keeper is defined as a person who owns the mother of a litter of puppies regardless of where that person resides. For any dog that is not a puppy the keeper is defined as the person with whom the dog normally resides.

The Microchipping of Dogs Regulations 2014 are as follows:

For every keeper of a dog that is currently not microchipped they have until 6 April 2016 to microchip their dog and register with an approved microchip database

From 6 April 2016 keepers must ensure puppies are microchipped and registered with an approved microchip database before 8 weeks old (prior to leaving the breeder)

Any changes to a keeper’s details must be updated on an approved microchip database

Where a dog is transferred to a new keeper – the new keeper must, unless the previous keeper had already done so, record their contact details on an approved microchip database

No keeper may transfer a dog to a new keeper (this includes breeders) until it has been microchipped, unless a certificate from a veterinary surgeon has been issued regarding the dog’s health

Full details need to be recorded on an approved database for the dog and the keeper. This includes the name and address of the keeper, and if the keeper is the breeder and has a local authority licence this will also need to be recorded

Regarding implanting microchips, no person may implant a microchip unless they are a veterinary professional or if they have been on a training course approved by the Secretary of State

Any person that has already received training regarding implanting microchips will be exempt from the above. If a person cannot show they have received any training (only practical experience) then they will have to acquire appropriate training

Anyone who identifies an adverse reaction to a microchip or the failure of a microchip must report it to the Secretary of State

The provision in the regulations also allows docked working dogs up to 12 weeks to be microchipped instead of 8 weeks, provided the tail docking requirements are met. However, the microchipping regulations that require a puppy to be microchipped and registered before transfer to a new keeper remain

Anyone who does not have their dog microchipped after 6 April 2016 will have 21 days to have the dog microchipped, and failure to do so may result in a fine of up to £500. Under the new regulations it is also a requirement that the records must be kept up to date and failure to do so could lead to enforcement action resulting in a fine for non-compliance. Other offences that may result in a fine of up to £500 include implanting a microchip without relevant authorisation, and not reporting any adverse reactions to the Secretary of State.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary said: “The Kennel Club has always been dedicated to reuniting dogs with their owners through Petlog and through our campaign as part of the Microchipping Alliance to make permanent identification compulsory.

“The microchipping regulations will go a long way towards improving dog welfare by ensuring that dog owners are more aware of their responsibilities, and that microchipping as well as keeping contact details up to date ensures speedy reunification of a missing dog with its owner. In addition, it will add traceability of where each dog has come from, and in turn should assist with improving health and welfare issues such as puppy farming.”

Celia Walsom from Petlog commented: “We welcome the announcement of the new microchipping regulations. The regulations highlight the importance of dog owners ensuring that they register their pet’s details to an approved database – not only because this is now a legal requirement but also because it is in the interest of the welfare of their dogs to do so. With over 12,000 lost and found telephone calls received by Petlog alone in one month, it is critical that contact details are kept up to date – it is heart breaking for all concerned when we cannot reunite lost pets with their owners.

“The regulations include provisions for everything, including ensuring the quality of the microchip being to ISO standard, training requirements of implanters and responsibilities laid down for approved databases. We are very committed to ensuring that this benefits all dog owners and most importantly improves the welfare of the millions of dogs in this country.”
To view the Microchipping of Dogs (England) Regulations 2014 in full please visit http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukdsi/2014/9780111122501/contents.

It is worth noting that the microchipping regulations do not affect the requirement for collars and tags as part of the Control of Dogs Order 1992.

The Control of Dogs Order 1992 mandates that any dog in a public place must wear a collar with the owner's name, address and postcode engraved or written on it, or engraved on a dog identity tag.

October 2014

KENNEL CLUB INTRODUCES NEW CHALLENGE CERTIFICATE POLICY FOR CHAMPIONSHIP SHOWS

The Kennel Club has announced the first policy change to result from the work of its Dog Show Promotion Working Party, which is looking into ways to improve and increase the popularity of dog shows.

Following a recommendation from the working party, the Kennel Club has introduced a new policy to allow breed clubs to hold their Championship shows in conjunction with another club, or with a larger General or Group Championship show. Effective from 1 January 2015, this new policy will allow two sets of Challenge Certificates in the same breed to be awarded at two different Championship shows on the same day, at the same venue.

As a result of this change in policy, breed clubs and General Championship show societies, as well as exhibitors and the show itself, can benefit from sharing a venue. It is hoped that working in partnership in this way will lead to increased show entries and will therefore be of mutual benefit to the world of dog shows. Societies which choose to adopt this initiative should advise the Kennel Club of their intention once a formal written agreement has been formed between the two societies.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “The Dog Show Promotion Working Party has been considering a number of ways in which dog shows can be improved upon as part of its dedicated strategy to re-popularise dog shows. We believe this is an important development for the future of dog showing and hope that this, along with other Working Party initiatives, will have a positive impact for dog showing.”

The Kennel Club has published a set of FAQs to assist show societies, exhibitors and judges with the implications of this new policy, which can be viewed here. In addition to this, updated specimen schedules will be available on the Kennel Club website to reflect the changes. Clubs may also be interested to know that those clubs which adopt this policy are permitted to share a schedule if they so wish.

Keith Young, Dog Show Promotion Working Party Chairman, said: “We believe that this proposal will have a positive impact on the show calendar by increasing the number of available show dates, and that it will be advantageous to both show societies and exhibitors as it will lead to a reduction in costs for all concerned.”
Anyone requiring further information about this announcement should please contact breedshows@thekennelclub.org.uk.

August 2014

KENNEL CLUB ISSUES ADVICE ON SOCIAL MEDIA USE

The Kennel Club has issued advice to people using Facebook and other social media platforms to discuss issues concerning Kennel Club-based activities such as breeding, competing with and judging dogs.

The Kennel Club is made aware on a regular basis of conversations held on public internet forums which sometimes include disparaging comments on dogs bred, one-sided accounts of private disputes, criticism of judging from exhibitors and other judges, and in extreme cases threats made against individuals.

The Kennel Club is unable to directly intervene in the majority of such cases and has issued the following guidance which is intended to provide advice to people who have been the subject of such allegations and criticism, those who have been involved in such discussions, and also to give direction on when the Kennel Club can and cannot intervene.

To those conversing on social media

This is addressed to those who think that careless, uninhibited and ill-considered comment and criticism aimed at judges, dogs and exhibitors on Facebook and other forums is acceptable and that its impact will not offend, hurt or deeply distress, alongside damaging people’s reputations.

Freedom of expression and opinion is, of course, a right of all – but that should be in the context of normal and civil behaviour. In other words if you have something worthwhile to say, then it should be said in a spirit of constructive criticism and not in an offensive manner.

Judges should take great care in joining in such conversations since it is not acceptable for judges to criticise fellow judges’ decisions in a disparaging way. Judges should keep a distance from contentious issues and maintain an independent and private view. This is a matter of perception, public confidence and general respect for those involved in any breed at a senior level.  Judges should certainly not give indications about preferences and intentions on placing for a forthcoming appointment. 

Anyone judging at Kennel Club licensed events is warned that in certain circumstances the Kennel Club will refer inappropriate content to the Judges Sub-Committee for a review of status and future appointments.

To those reading social media content

Anyone who finds him or herself targeted, or the subject of such conversations, is advised to ignore such material and not to read, respond or engage in the conversation. The law is intended to offer protection from the more extreme material.

Try to put the matter into perspective; everyone’s reality is subjective and most of the material is a matter of opinion, on occasions an expression of anger, and is often not based on verified fact. Rude, spiteful and ill-informed comments say more about those writing them than about those who they seek to criticise.

In extreme cases of direct threat or harassment, then the police should be contacted.

The Crown Prosecution Service recently issued guidelines on prosecuting cases involving communications sent by social media and these can be found at www.cps.gov.uk/legal/a_to_c/communications_sent_via_social_media/.

These guidelines take the approach that there must be something more than ‘the expression of unpopular opinion about serious or trivial matters, banter or humour even if distasteful to some or painful to those subjected to it’ before intervention is possible.

The Kennel Club has to apply a similar approach and policy and is therefore unable to intervene in the majority of cases.

It remains our advice that it is better not to read, engage or respond to this sort of material. Sometimes it is better to allow those who choose to air views on these channels the freedom to do so, even if they do not do so in an adult and mature fashion. Those who wish to read such postings should treat such content, particularly if critical, with caution and not make any judgment or assume the truth or foundation on the basis of what is being written. Social media content should generally be treated as gossip and not a validated and reliable source of information.

Ultimately if you feel you have to join in, be informed and be polite; if you have to read the content, do not assume what is said is true; and if you are the subject of gossip or rumour then treat it for what it is. And remember that the most effective and practical way to deal with offending material is not to join in or respond.

A few general guidelines that all social media users should follow are included below:

You are responsible for what you post since it is a public medium.

Maintain privacy: Do not post confidential information. Do not discuss a situation involving named or pictured individuals without their permission.

Does it pass the publicity test: If the content of your message would not be acceptable for face to face conversation, over the phone or in any other medium, then it is not acceptable for a social networking site.

Think before you post: If you feel angry or passionate about a subject, it is wise to delay posting until you are calm and clear headed. There is no such thing as a ‘private’ social media site, even if you delete a post.

Be aware of liability: You are responsible for what you post on your own site and on the sites of others. Individual bloggers could be held liable for commentary deemed to be libellous, obscene or which infringes copyright.

What the Kennel Club can and cannot do

The Kennel Club’s jurisdiction lies primarily with the enforcement of its Regulations and issues arising out of registrations and incidents at licensed events. It does not have any remit or authority to censor material on the internet, or to censure those involved, and is therefore unable to intervene directly in the majority of cases.

However, there are ways to deal with the extreme versions of offending material online, including complaints for defamation or harassment or sending malicious correspondence. These are criminal or civil offences and forum moderators are usually (or should be) quick to respond and remove content that has no place being published.

Extreme cases of threat or bullying should be reported to the legal authorities and to the Kennel Club for consideration and advice.

 

July 2014

KENNEL CLUB RELEASES NEW ANNUAL BREED AVERAGES FOR INBREEDING

The Kennel Club has released a new set of annual breed averages for the coefficient of inbreeding (COIs) in each pedigree breed on its free online health resource, Mate Select.

Mate Select provides breeders with inbreeding coefficient calculators for all dogs found on the Kennel Club’s Breed Register. These calculators use all pedigree records stored on the Kennel Club’s database to calculate the COI of individual Kennel Club registered dogs, puppies that could be produced from hypothetical matings, and each breed as a whole.

Each of the COI calculators uses all available pedigree information and does not limit the number of generations used, making each calculation as precise as possible. 

Prior to July 2014, the breed average calculations were based on all dogs recorded by the Kennel Club during the previous year. This included imported dogs, dogs that form part of an overseas pedigree but are not necessarily registered with the Kennel Club, dogs born one year and registered the next, and dogs registered late (over a year old).

Following feedback from users, the Kennel Club has reviewed and recalculated the COIs on Mate Select to reflect just those dogs born and registered within the UK in a given year. In future, this calculation will be carried out each June and will generate the annual breed average using Kennel Club registered dogs born in the UK between January and December of the previous year. Using this data will provide a more effective means of monitoring yearly change than by using the average of all recorded dogs in each breed.

In smaller breeds, if no dogs have been born in that year, the annual breed average will default to the last year in which a calculation could be performed. In breeds where there is no available annual breed average data for the past five years, the annual breed average will display as ‘N/A’.  This may include breeds where no dogs have been born in the UK for five years or more, and some newly recognised breeds.

Of the 215 Kennel Club-recognised breeds, 206 meet the new criteria of having dogs born in the UK in the last five years.  The remaining nine breeds consist of either new breeds where no dogs have yet been born in the UK, or breeds where no dogs have been born in the UK in the last five years.

The changes do not impact on any individual dog’s inbreeding coefficient, including imported dogs, nor the COIs of hypothetical matings.

Of the 206 breeds, using the new calculation, the annual breed average COI has decreased for 9 breeds and stays the same for an additional 12.  Of the 185 breeds with higher annual breed average COIs following the revision:

  • 74 are 1% or less higher (e.g. increasing from an annual breed average COI of 5% to 6% or less)
  • 76 are between 1% and 3% higher (e.g. from an annual breed average COI of 5% to between 6% and 8%)
  • 19 are between 3% and 5% higher (e.g. from an annual breed average COI of 5% to between 8% and 10%)
  • 16 are more than 5% higher (e.g. from a breed average COI of 5% to 10% or more)

Five breeds did not have any dogs born in the UK in 2013 and so the current annual breed average COI is based on the most recent year in which an annual breed average could be calculated.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary said: “We believe that these new annual breed averages will not only help breeders to continue to make responsible choices when choosing which dogs to use for breeding, but also show the effect that these decisions have for their breed year-on-year.

“Although the new calculations may appear to show that the COI in some breeds has changed significantly in the last year, this is not necessarily the case, but reflects the fact that  the previous figures drew data from a different set of criteria and we have now modified this to use more relevant data from solely UK-born dogs. These revised figures draw a new base line from which breeders can follow the improvements made within their breeds as they make responsible choices to help manage genetic diversity.

“Our breeding guidelines state that, where possible, breeders should produce puppies with an inbreeding coefficient which is at, or below, the annual breed average and ideally as low as possible. By doing so, breed enthusiasts should be able to manage and monitor their breed’s genetic diversity year on year and see how their breeding decisions ultimately have a significant impact on the health and welfare of the breed.”

Further information on COIs and the Kennel Club’s Mate Select resource can be found at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/mateselect or by emailing mateselect@thekennelclub.org.uk.

June 2014

CRUFTS QUALIFICATION MEDAL HERE

KENNEL CLUB REMINDER ON JUDGES’ CRITIQUES

The Kennel Club would like to remind judges at Championship and Open breed club shows that a written critique for the first two placings in each class must be submitted to at least one of the weekly United Kingdom canine journals.

The Kennel Club has been made aware of instances of judges submitting critiques to other outlets, including Facebook pages, assuming this complies with Kennel Club Regulations, and would like to remind all judges of the correct procedure as stated in Kennel Club show regulations, which is as follows:

Regulation F(1)22d

‘All judges at Championship Shows and Open Breed Club Shows must produce a written critique for the first two placings in each class, and will dispatch these to at least one of the weekly United Kingdom Canine journals.’

The Kennel Club has published a set of FAQs which cover the most common questions addressed to the Kennel Club by both exhibitors and judges in regard to show regulations, which can be viewed at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/activities/dog-showing/already-involved-in-dog-showing/exhibitors and www.thekennelclub.org.uk/activities/dog-showing/already-involved-in-dog-showing/judges respectively.

Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club Secretary, said: “Whilst the vast majority of judges are following the correct procedure, there have been instances of critiques being submitted to various places online, including Facebook pages and club websites, rather than to either one of the weekly dog papers which should be the case.

“Judges are welcome to add their critiques to social media and other outlets but must also remember to send them, preferably first, to either Our Dogs and/or Dog World as required by Kennel Club regulations.”

The Kennel Club’s regulations can be found at www.thekennelclub.org.uk/media/49543/showregs.pdf

ENDS
23rd June 2014

BREED CLUB EXPERTISE SOUGHT FOR LARGE SCALE BREED HEALTH SURVEY

The Kennel Club is calling for the help and expertise of breed clubs as it prepares to launch a survey which will aim to give the most wide-ranging insight into dog breed health to date.

The 2014 Pedigree Breed Health Survey will be sent out in the coming months to 385,000 people who have registered pedigree dogs with the Kennel Club in the past 15 years and who have signed up to receive emails.

However, in the current phase of the project the Kennel Club is contacting all breed health coordinators and asking them to seek input from their breed clubs, so that the survey can be tailored to illuminate breed specific health issues, in addition to general issues related to dog health.

The project, which follows up on the Kennel Club’s 2004 Purebred Dog Health Survey, is being developed in collaboration with Dr Tom Lewis and aims to improve our understanding of the general health of all dog breeds, highlight positive progress in the breeds since 2004, and better understand the prevalence of current health concerns.

Aimee Llewellyn, Breed Health and Information Manager, said: “This is the first time that a project has been undertaken on this scale, and across so many different breeds, and we hope that it will provide invaluable insights to vets, scientists, breeders and all those with a concern in improving dog health.

“In the first phase of this project we are calling on the expertise of breed health coordinators, who can coordinate with their breed clubs and feed back to us with any breed specific conditions that they have seen emerging or affecting their breed and that they feel should be reflected in our survey. Their expertise and experiences are vital to ensuring that this survey is as accurate and detailed as possible.

“Once we have collated this information we can finalise the survey and this will be made available to all owners of Kennel Club registered dogs.”

Breed health coordinators are asked to give any feedback from their breed clubs to the Kennel Club by 1st August 2014, by emailing bonnie.wiles@thekennelclub.org.uk

Kennel Club warning about Microchip Company

The Kennel Club has been alerted to a misleading campaign by a microchip database, which claims to be associated with Petlog, the largest lost and found microchip database, managed by the Kennel Club.

The Kennel Club has been informed that a new company on the market has been contacting breeders through the Kennel Club website to sell its microchips and database service. The organisation claims to be recognised by Petlog.

read more here

Kennel Club to permit the planned use of dual sires

Following a feedback process started last year and careful consideration by its Dog Health Group, the Kennel Club has agreed to permit the registration of puppies from planned dual matings without the need for permission in advance.

The idea was first floated by Kennel Club Chairman, Professor Steve Dean, in the April 2012 edition of the Kennel Gazette, the Kennel Club’s monthly publication. Among the reasons given for considering this change were increasing the genetic diversity in breeds and to reduce the detrimental impact of large single litters on gene pools in breeds which have a small population size. Professor Dean also put forward the idea that the concept of producing a litter from two sires could help reduce the impact of popular sires whilst still allowing some sires to be used more frequently than otherwise might be considered desirable by breeders with restricted opportunities to mate an individual bitch, following the Kennel Club lowering the limit on the number of litters an individual bitch may have to four. A request for feedback on the idea resulted in little response but nonetheless the Kennel Club was keen to gauge feelings towards the idea which is common practice in many countries.

Since the advent of DNA profiling it has been possible to separate progeny resulting from dual matings – and the Kennel Club has registered puppies accordingly. However, this has only been done in the case of accidental dual matings and in the past a breeder would have needed to request permission to undertake a planned breeding of this type. Consideration was given by the Kennel Club to the possibility of allowing registration of puppies from planned dual matings as a matter of course and the committee responsible requested the views of the Genetics and Health Screening Sub Group of the Kennel Club’s Dog Health Group, which includes independent experts in both canine and human genetics, a canine epidemiologist and a BVA-appointed veterinary surgeon.

The consensus of the group was that the idea is sound. There were no objections based on welfare grounds, provided that surgical AI is not involved, and the point was made that a two sire mating mimics natural behaviour. In addition, it was felt that there may be possible welfare advantages for the bitch, which may in effect produce two litters in one gestation/whelping. There may also be advantages in those breeds where an expansion of the gene pool is being sought. With the views of the Dog Health Group now recorded, the Kennel Club General Committee took the decision to permit the registration of puppies from planned dual matings, with progeny to be separated by DNA profiling prior to registration, at its meeting in June. The revised policy will be introduced with immediate effect.

10/6/2013